Search
 
 

Display results as :
 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Keywords

Latest topics
February 2018
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728    

Calendar Calendar

Affiliates
free forum

The most tagged keywords


200 Golden Moments+

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 27 Nov 2017 - 16:26

Story 239-The Name of the Doctor

"But not in the name of the Doctor."
The Scene: Doctor Who fans up and down the country fly into outrage as they find out there's a secret Doctor.
Why it works: What else could I pick for this episode apart from the most thrilling cliff-hanger in Doctor Who's history? This very special episode is packed with magical moments (some of which are honoured later), but this is undeniably the best scene in the episode, because, as I've said so many times before, it was unexpected. We all knew, although this was a one part story, there'd be some kind of cliff-hanger to lead into the big special, but I doubt anybody thought it would be as big as this. The point of the show is that, although we don't know who the Doctor is exactly, we trust him. He's still a mystery, but he's the protagonist, and the rules of film language tell us we're meant to root for them, meaning they're trustworthy as a rule of thumb. Sure, Rule 1 might be 'The Doctor Lies', but he's never lied for the hell of it, it's always been for a reason. And, as we approach the 45th minute of this episode and it looks like Clara's saved the day, the subtle arc of the Dark Doctor is wrapped up here as we, along with audience surrogate Clara, find out there's another Doctor-which just completely messes up the rules of the show, and leaves us genuinely wanting more before the special. What happened in the Time War? Why have we never heard of this guy before? Does this mean our merchandise is incorrectly labelled? It says something about the fans too, perhaps one of the best fandoms in the bunch, that copies of this episode were leaked on Blu-Ray two weeks before broadcast, and the majority of them were good enough not to spoil the surprise. And what a surprise! John Hurt! Him, the proper film actor, doing Doctor Who! As the Doctor! It speaks volumes that we got an actor of his calibre to take time out and give over so much time to one little British sci-fi show, and serves as a reminder in this important year just how significantly the world has changed because of one November night in 1963...

Tomorrow-It might be a couple of days late, but a bumper 50th Anniversary celebration entry consisting of the best moments from The Day of the Doctor, The Night of the Doctor, An Adventure in Space and Time, The Five-ish Doctors and Doctor Who Live: The Afterparty! Due around mid-day.

Honourable Mentions-
"Yes, what is it? What do you want?"
Clara makes her mark on the Doctor's life in a very big way in one of the boldest opening sequences ever seen in the show, which wraps up not only this season's arc, but perhaps the first 50 years of the Doctor's life-she makes him choose the TARDIS, saves him and Bessie from a Time Scoop, forces him to dangle from a cliff with only an umbrella to support him-a reminder that Doctor Who is never afraid to be bold and break its own rules.

"And it was Trenzalore? Definitely Trenzalore?"
A rare reminder of the fact the Doctor gets emotional, and a poignant way of showing just how human our alien hero is.

"Your name, Doctor. Answer me."
A tense scene which again reminds us that the Doctor is a much darker and mysterious person than we think he is.

"Run. Run, you clever boy. And remember me."
Clara follows the Great Intelligence into the Doctor's time stream in a fantastically epic scene which is an explosive finale to this constantly fitting season closer.

"Use the TARDIS, use something. Save her, but for God's sake be sensible!"
The Doctor and River make their last goodbyes (chronologically, at least) in a touching scene which can be read as the Doctor's last farewell, and another reminder that the Doctor puts love and companionship before anything else. Truly, there is no other hero on TV, in film or in literature like him.

Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 28 Nov 2017 - 17:20

The 50th Anniversary Celebrations-23rd November 2013...

Story 240-The Day of the Doctor

"Clara sometimes asks me if I dream. Of course I dream, I tell her. Everybody dreams."
The Scene: The episode ends on a high as the Eleventh Doctor joins his predecessors.
Why it works: Oh, how difficult today was. If I could, I would have chosen the entire script for a golden moment (although the honourable mentions will probably contain the rest of the script), but this is, for me, the highlight, and I know people will disagree with me, because the best thing about this multi layered episode is that there's something for everyone. There's Coal Hill for the older fans, UNIT for the Pertwee era, that magical Baker cameo, the glorious return of David Tennant for the newer fans, and even a little something new for those who like their extended universe. But this scene quite literally sums up the first 50 years of Doctor Who in a perfect, concise way. Not only do we get to see all thirteen Doctors, but the writing is word perfect too-an anniversary special can't just be about looking back, it has to look forward too, which is what this episode does so magically. Steven Moffat said in promo material for the episode that it starts Chapter 2 of the Doctor's life, and for once, that wasn't hyperbole-the Doctor has a genuine new purpose to his adventures now, and in a neat bit of symmetry, he's travelling the universe to find the thing that his escape from it made him want to start adventuring. And as we get that amazing soundtrack coming through, and the awesome credits kick in, every fan across the country must have felt quite privileged that this little British sci-fi show could pull off such a movie-sized feast for such a special occasion, and even more amazingly, everybody else across the world wanted to join in. There is much debate about when the golden age of Doctor Who was, but it's safe to say this was one of the most successful episodes of all time.

Honourable Mentions-
"Next time, would it kill you to knock?"
The TARDIS is taken directly to Trafalgar Square in one of Doctor Who's most visually impressive scenes ever which kick starts the episode in real style. It looked amazing in 3-D.

"Soldier, I'm going to need your gun."
John Hurt makes his mark in the Whoniverse in a memorable introduction scene which makes use of some of the best directing, editing and effects work the show has ever seen. They really are pulling out all the stops for this one.

"Stuck between a girl and a box. Story of your life, eh, Doctor?"
The Moment springs to life in a genius bit of writing which shows the right way to bring back a cast member without undermining their exit-if anything, this adds to it.

"It means we're going to need a new horse."
The Tenth Doctor is back on form and supplying the comedy which helps to alleviate some of the many dark moments in this episode.

"Anyone lose a fez?"
Classic Doctor banter as the three main incarnations meet up and royally take the piss out of each other.

"The Doctor will save me. The Doctor will save me."
Even Osgood gets some development in this packed story, again showing how fully rounded Who's guest cast are.

"It's the same screwdriver. Same software, different case."
A powerful character study into the Doctor's character as the very different incarnations learn how to work together.

"Any second now, you're going to stop that countdown. Both of you, together."
The Doctors wipe UNIT's memories to stop a bomb going off, a reminder that there is always a peaceful solution to everything.

"No, sir. All thirteen!"
In a genuinely legendary moment, every Doctor ever comes to the rescue to save Gallifrey and the show really does change forever.

"You know, I really think you might."
Every fan in the country gets chills as Matt Smith turns around to see the face behind an iconic voice-a well deserved cameo with a real purpose.

Other Amazing Celebrations-
An Adventure in Space and Time
The undoubted highlight of the anniversary year saw the well known story of Who's creation told in a brilliant new light, adding real depth to the people involved and making what was once a niche topic relatable to the masses. A moving insight into William Hartnell's life, and a much needed celebration of the work of Sydney Newman, the brilliant Verity Lambert and Waris Hussein.

The Night of the Doctor
Oh, this was something special. After 17 years, he's back-and it's about time. Paul McGann makes a welcome return in seven minutes in heaven for Doctor Who fans, as we get that long awaited regeneration and get to see more of a fabulous actor who was underserved by the hour he got in 1996.

The Five-ish Doctors Reboot
A hilarious half hour which makes fun of Doctor Who in a loving way, one of the hardest things to pull off, in a rip-roaring special filled with celebrity cameos and piss-taking all round. If only it had been released on DVD outside of that impossible to find box set.

Doctor Who Live: The Afterparty
We can laugh about it now, but this was undeniably the worst part of the celebrations, but it's so bad it's good. From failed video chats with One Direction, to a pointless gathering of companions, this abominable hour of television did at least provide some sense of celebration of the fantastic show we all know and love, and it gave us a rare chance to see the great Jackie Lane make a contribution to the programme.

Thank you all for reading today's mammoth entry! Tomorrow, we bid farewell to Matt Smith in The Time of the Doctor, with a brief extra appraisal of his entire era!


Last edited by Dalek on Fri 1 Dec 2017 - 15:53; edited 1 time in total

Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 29 Nov 2017 - 12:35

Story 241-The Time of the Doctor

"Everything you are, gone in a moment, like breath on a mirror."
The Scene: The Doctor trips and hallucinates over Amy for a bit before regenerating, whilst Clara looks on confused.
Why it works: Obviously, I had to pick the regeneration scene, didn't I? It's genuinely iconic, and whilst the episode itself may not be that strong plot wise, it's full of fantastic scenes (see Honourable Mentions for more) and this is definitely the best of those. Like The End of Time, my favourite regeneration story, it takes the time to explain to viewers through the inexperienced eyes of Clara what exactly regeneration is, that it's like death, and it does hurt, but the end result is for the better-what a fabulous message to send to the kids. But it's also beautifully written for the adults-without stooping to condescension, Moffat's monologue sums up the experience of life poignantly bordering on poetically, to create a very moving final scene for this Doctor. Furthermore, it does what The Day of the Doctor did best and looks not only forwards, but backwards. The little touches like Amelia and the Fish Custard create some sort of semblance of the Doctor's life flashing before his eyes, and the dropping of the bow tie really helps to say this is the end of the line. But then, Capaldi comes along and within a couple of lines, we know we're in safe hands.

Afterword-
Before we get to the Honourable Mentions, I just want to say a little something about this marvellous era we're leaving. I know I didn't do one for the Tennant era, but I kind of made my point in the actual entry for that one. It might have been a controversial couple of years, the move to series long stories for one being heavily criticised, but I just want to draw attention to the fact that this underrated era brought the Whoniverse a number of amazing things. The new series has lasted long enough by now, and been successful enough, to not be ashamed of its past and we've seen more classic references than ever before, in particular in the amazing 50th Anniversary story. We've had interesting new characters and genius new stories. We've had Bill Nighy and John Hurt doing guest appearances. And best of all, the show's finally made it big in the states. When you see the TARDIS image plastered over anything you can imagine, you've made it. It's a remarkable feat that, after eight years, the show's popularity has never wavered massively, and it's still cool to say you're proud to be a Whovian.

Honourable Mentions-
"You've got to be the Drunk Giraffe! You've got to commit! Don't be cool, guys! Cool is not cool!"
Matt Smith gives a final comedy performance as the funniest Doctor of the lot, and this adorable scene shows the Doctor as the grandfather we'd all love to have, stretching all the way back to the William Hartnell days- a neat bit of symmetry considering this is the final story of his first regeneration cycle.

"Thank you, Handles. And well done. Well done, mate."
The Doctor's longest serving companion bites the dust in a touching scene which helps the Doctor realise his time is nearly up.

"And now it's time for one last bow, like all your other selves. Eleven's hour is over now, the clock is striking Twelve."
Honestly, I'm getting teary just writing that. Clara reads the Doctor a poem from a rubbish classy cracker just before the hero goes off to face his death.

"You think you can stop me now, Daleks? If you want my life...come! And! Get! It!"
The Doctor is given a new regeneration cycle and uses the energy to destroy the Daleks in an epic denouement which gives Matt Smith the last chance to show himself as a hero.

Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 30 Nov 2017 - 15:36

Story 242-Deep Breath

"He sounds old. Please tell me I didn't get old, anything but old. I was young. Oh, is he grey?"
The Scene: Clara thinks about leaving the Doctor, but is stopped by a phone call from an old friend.
Why it works: Every Doctor has a scene where they become the part, and in this spectacular opening episode, Capaldi has quite a few, but, for me, this is the one where he secures the role. Although he's been heroic already and done all the regular stuff the Doctor does, he hasn't become friends with the companion yet-surely the most important thing to do, seeing as they're our audience surrogate and everything, and the fantastic thing about this scene is the unique way that it's done. Evidently, Capaldi's a very different Doctor to what we've had before, and a friendly chat wouldn't cut the mustard this time, and the idea of including the previous Doctor is brilliant-as well as providing closure to those too young to fully comprehend regeneration, it provides reassurance that it's okay to be scared, because the Doctor is too. And although we've seen him be both kind and cruel in the episode, we leave on a calming note that he's mostly kind and although he's not always going to show it, he still has good in him-proving once and for all that Capaldi is perhaps the definitive Doctor.

Honourable Mentions-
"The green one and the not green one. Or it could be the other way round, I mustn't prejudge."
The traditional post-regeneration scene opens the episode in hilarious fashion as the Doctor manages to thoroughly confuse the Paternoster Gang.

"Just because my pretty face has turned your head, do not assume that I am so easily distracted."
Clara proves what she's made of in a well edited scene which is perhaps the first indication of the more sophisticated direction Capaldi's era will have, including the phenomenal Rachel Talalay.

"Well, I don't like it either. Well, it's all right up until the eyebrows. Then it just goes haywire."
The Doctor confronts a scared hobo in another scene letting him show his comedy potential.

"Nothing is more important than my egomania!"
A curiously interesting long conversation between the Doctor and Clara in a restaurant proves itself to be an unexpected highlight.

"Go on, then. Do it. I'm not going to answer any of your questions, so you have to do it."
Clara proves herself as a companion yet again and, for the first time, perhaps shows she can be just as strong without the Doctor to bounce off.

"You realise, of course, one of us is lying about our basic programming."
The Doctor plays the hero for the first time in this incarnation as he probably pushes the Half-Face Man to his death.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 1 Dec 2017 - 16:03

Story 243-Into the Dalek

"Imagine the worst possible thing in the universe, then don't bother, because you're looking at it right now. This is evil refined as engineering."
The Scene: The Doctor, Clara and friends venture inside the Dalek...
Why it works: We may have got a fully rounded view into Capaldi's Doctor last week, but there's still work to be done-nobody can fully convince based on just their first episode, there's always a lot of other things the character can do, and this episode explores the darker side of this Doctor fantastically. It might have been easy to just jump into the adventures seeing as we had a longer first episode to get to know the Doctor better, but here, we see his nastier half in brilliant glory, which makes a nice contrast with the next episode, where his lighter side is allowed to dominate. But it was also a clever touch to have the Daleks in his second episode-what better way is there to contrast a darker force of good with a lighter force of evil? Both characters are, not for the first time but for the first time in a while, seeing life through each other's eyes, and in another fab piece of character development, they help each other see as they did before. But as well as bringing a new touch to the role, we also see Capaldi play the traditional Doctor-as we see him here genuinely amazed to be stepping into new territory, and explaining the threat of the Daleks in such a hating manner, it's hard not to feel secure with him in the role. However, just a few seconds later, when he fails to save a man from one of the antibodies, we're reminded that this is a new, unpredictable man, which makes the new series all the more exciting.

Honourable Mention-
"And isn't the universe beautiful?"
Clara inspires the Doctor to remind Rusty what he saw in the universe in a classic, fan-pleasing scene which epitomises the effect of the Daleks on the show, and the character of the Doctor especially, perhaps better than it has ever been expressed in the series before.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 2 Dec 2017 - 7:32

Story 244-Robot of Sherwood

"The Doctor and Robin Hood locked up in a cellar. Is this seriously the best that you can do?"
The Scene: To Clara's dismay, the Doctor and Robin Hood quibble endlessly in a dungeon.
Why it works: Just as the last episode showed Capaldi's darker side, this episode spins the character in completely the opposite direction and makes his comedy side come out more prominently than ever. This might be expected, seeing as this is one of the funniest episodes in a while, but, again, it also shows how multi-faceted this brilliant Doctor is. He's grumpy and stubborn, refusing to believe Robin Hood, he's heroic when he frees the slaves from the Knights, but, most obviously, he's the funny friend. There are tons of iconic comedy moments such as the spoon sword fight, the archery contest, and the banter displayed most prominently in this laugh out loud scene packed with genuinely rib tickling gags. Furthermore, it adds to 12's character development-he's learned by the end of this episode how to work with normal people and expand his mind, but Robin's last message reminds us that he's still dark and more untrustworthy than any Doctor since perhaps the seventh. The scene also expands Clara's role brilliantly-we get more insight into her otherwise vague past in this episode, and this sequence in particular reminds us that she's our eyes-we can see the irritating male banter as completely irrational and insane, and we completely understand when she's mistaken to be the leader, and therefore find comedy in the fact that this bemuses the Doctor and Robin. In a fun, pulpy tale, it's nice to know that character development and realism haven't been forgotten.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 3 Dec 2017 - 21:40

Story 245-Listen

"There is danger in this room, and guess what? It's you! Do you feel it? Do you think he feels it?"
The Scene: The Doctor tries to convince young Rupert Pink to turn his back on the creature.
Why it works: In just four episodes, Peter Capaldi has proved himself as the definitive Doctor-almost. The only thing he hasn't done yet is prove how he works with children, which is pulled off here with great success. In this marvellous scene, Capaldi shows the humanity of his Doctor perhaps the best way of his whole era, an essential quality to this story because, at its heart, it's all about children. It taps into that very primal fear that we don't exactly know what scares us, or why, and what better way to show this than to use children? They have no suspension of disbelief, and genuinely believe that there is a monster under the bed. But the best thing about this wonderful episode is, that like the other true classic of Capaldi's era (Heaven Sent), not everything is explained. The characters don't know what's under the bed, so why should we? It encourages thinking and creativity in an age of television so filled with worthless reality tat and mass produced entertainment. One of the best things is that it shows the Doctor himself as a child-when even our hero is none the wiser by the end and more scared than he's been in a while, it sends a great message to the kids that it's okay to be scared, and okay to ask questions. Some might say this isn't character development, but, in fact, it's the best kind. The Doctor might think he knows it all, but by the end of the episode, he knows not everything has an answer, and he's okay with this. Moffat might have gotten a lot of flack over his writing, but it's tough to deny this, along with Blink and the aforementioned masterpiece Heaven Sent, is one of his greatest accomplishments.

Honourable Mentions-

"Listen! Question. Why do we talk out loud when we know we're alone?"
The Doctor ponders one of the real mysteries of life in one of the most ambiguous and exciting cold opens seen in the show in recent years.

"I'm going to leave you something. Just so you'll always remember. Fear makes companions of us all."
Clara comforts the young Doctor in a truly iconic scene which adds in a lovely touch of nostalgia for the fans watching without it being too self indulgent, and cements Clara's own place as a worthwhile companion.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 4 Dec 2017 - 15:11

Story 246-Time Heist

"Keep your mind clear, Clara. Keep your mind blank."
The Scene: The Teller catches Clara, and the only thing she can do is remember what the Doctor told her.
Why it works: I've spoken a lot about character development and emotion and all that in this blog so much it's sort of become a bit of a meme, but one of the few topics I haven't touched on is the Monsters of Doctor Who (which sounds like an ideal title for some sort of cash-in book/magazine), and I'm bringing it up today because of the Teller. As much as I love the human characters in the show, it's a bit of a shame that delving deeper into their lives has arguably come at the cost of interesting monsters, or deep plots, but this episode rectifies both lacking factors in amazing style. The Teller is one of the best and most realistic monsters we've had in the show for many a year. He feels like a real character, not just a threat of the week-he doesn't want to be bank security, but he's doing it for that most human of emotions, love. Not to mention the general premise is very intriguing-how do you escape a monster who reads your mind and feeds off your guilt? Truly terrifying. The best part, perhaps, is his purpose in the plot. It's not a case of just using a random monster with a unique gimmick, it makes sense in the narrative that the supposedly most impregnable bank in the universe has such strong security-security as strong as the script, which is one of the most fun we've had in a while. Whilst not a classic, this is very good pulp, and, unlike other stories, has a romp without losing any of the integrity of more serious stories. The two Steves play around with time travel, interesting and disturbing ideas, fantastic characterisation and a few genuinely good twists, whilst even throwing in a couple of references which please the fans without detracting from the quality of the script, which is only further enhanced by the genius casting of the phenomenal Keeley Hawes, one of Britain's most talented actors and one of the few women who could have pulled off Karabraxos' determination and naivety with such realistic skill. It might not top any fan favourite lists, but this story is a gem, perfect for a relaxing watch whilst still standing up to critical scrutiny.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 5 Dec 2017 - 12:26

Story 247-The Caretaker

"Five stop intruder. Five stop intruder."
The Scene: A Policeman meets his demise investigating an empty building currently occupied by the Skovox Blitzer.
Why it works: Like yesterday's entry, this is a seemingly simple tale at first that shouldn't be taken at face value. Although it's essentially another fun romp, and an out and out comedy at times, there are some wonderful scenes littered throughout, featuring real characterisation of Clara and Danny's relationship, some wonderfully shot action sequences and the undeniable fun of the pre titles sequence. But perhaps the best is today's standout scene, where an innocent Policeman is killed by the Skovox Blitzer. Now, I may have spoken most of this blog highlighting the best of Moffat's era, but one of the worst things about it is that hardly anybody dies. Death makes the danger feel more real, and the scare levels go up. Part of the reason nobody's scared of a Dalek any more is because they haven't exterminated anybody in years! But in this unusually bleak scene, the fear of Doctor Who returns, as Moffat takes advantage of the later time slot and shows a horribly brutal death scene which proves the might of this week's threat, because it was needed more than ever. The Skovox Blitzer is referred to many times in the script as being one of the universe's most fearsome creatures, and we've had a lot of those by now, so it was really needed to show why this one deserves the title, especially seeing as its design could be laughable in the wrong light-which makes now a good time to also talk about the behind the scenes talent of the show. I don't talk about them much, but in the Capaldi era more than ever, the level of cinematography and lighting and sound effects have reached their peak, and, excitingly, are said to be even better for Series 11. It's a simple way of showing how much Doctor Who is appreciated now by using top notch equipment for every episode, and a far cry from the days of Myrka lumbering down brightly lit corridors. And the less said about that kick, the better.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 6 Dec 2017 - 12:04

Story 248-Kill the Moon

"It was cheap, it was pathetic. No, no, no, it was patronising."
The Scene: Clara and the Doctor have an intense row after he leaves her to make a decision by herself.
Why it works: I'm going to say it-I love Kill the Moon. Yes, I know, the science makes absolutely no sense at all, and the plot isn't much either, but the talent behind it is phenomenal. The effects are great, the cinematography is absolutely astounding, the music is on top form, but the best thing about it is the acting. Obviously, we've got Hermione Norris in for a week, so that's good enough, but then we get this amazing scene in which our regulars give it their all. This is undoubtedly the highlight of Jenna Coleman's time on the show. For all those people who said at first she had no character, this scene shows a more fully rounded woman than we took for granted at first. The writing is spot on, and her performance helps us to genuinely believe Clara is pissed off here, and rightly so. For all the nonsense of the plot, the moral dilemma at the heart of it is fascinating, and can be put into a real life perspective now with Brexit looming. This underrated episode shows Clara as headstrong, fearless and intuitive-essentially the perfect companion. And I can't go without mentioning Peter Capaldi's performance here. He's still one of the best Doctors ever even when he's mostly silent. Just look at his face. He looks so genuinely betrayed and upset, and the subtleties in his voice and movements convey the Doctor perfectly. Peter Capaldi is the Doctor for nineteen more days, and that's a great shame. Treasure this remarkable actor whilst you can, and appreciate the outstanding contribution he's made to the show.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 7 Dec 2017 - 7:28

Story 249-Mummy on the Orient Express

"I'm the Doctor and I will be your victim this evening. Are you my mummy?"
The Scene: The Doctor adopts Maisie's personality to attract the Foretold.
Why it works: Oh, this is a great episode. Like previous episodes this series, it's a pulpy romp, but, unlike many others, it isn't flimsy. The plot is so well rounded, there's a reason for everything and the characters are fascinating. It's an actual pleasure to watch it, so much so that I don't think there are any scenes which stand above the rest-they're all great. But I chose this one because it showcases everything that's great about the episode in a few minutes. The monster this week is utterly amazing. The Foretold is a rare monster with actually deep motivations, and he scares so well on TV alone, so God knows what it must be like at live shows like the Symphonic Spectacular. The script has so many well written lines and well placed, witty quips (did anybody not laugh at the Doctor's line above?) and it pushes the boundaries of what's acceptable for Doctor Who-would any other story have so many deaths, including a number in space? Jamie Mathieson proves in a spectacular debut the talent he has for story and creating real life characters, people exquisitely brought to life by actors who get the 1920s and are able to put some of that authenticity into the performance, including the remarkable Frank Skinner, who blends his straight and comedy acting talents into one of the best non companions we've ever had. And I can't go without mentioning the regulars again. We get more development, of the Doctor as a dark character and Clara being sympathetic, with top form performances from Jenna Coleman showing a more sensitive side to her character and Peter Capaldi showing the multi-faceted Doctor he's so great at playing. With one of his era's best writers having made his debut, the Capaldi era is well and truly underway, and it's good.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 8 Dec 2017 - 7:43

Story 250-Flatline

"You are monsters. That is the role you seem determined to play. So it seems I must play mine. The man that stops the monsters."
The Scene: The Doctor's back to full size, and gives the Boneless hell.
Why it works: Has there ever been a writer in Who's history with as strong a debut as Jamie Mathieson? If you thought Mummy on the Orient Express was good, this just blows it out of the park. It's quintessential Who, but it isn't clichéd in the slightest-literally everything is original and unique. Every scene is important and exciting, and that makes the episode a genuinely immersive watch. But this scene is today's highlight because it shows one of the strangest things about the episode-with the Doctor's presence being extremely strong in an episode he's hardly in. The Doctor's persona is explored without it dominating the plot-by making Clara the protagonist, we get to see how the Doctor is from the perspective of an outsider, and so does the Doctor. The false hope, the lies, the mistakes show the Doctor as a flawed person, but this amazing denouement shows him as the most important thing-the hero. Even when he's in a mini TARDIS, he's still the cleverest person in the room (so much so he can change his hair willy-nilly!). Before I go, I have to mention the brilliant guest acting in this episode (although maybe Rigsy doesn't count as he's been in two stories). Every little character is utterly believable, and it's hard not to feel something when Bill is relieved to be alive, or when the worst people survive. This amazing episode features scares, comedy, clever twists, fantastic acting, great special effects and completely original monsters-in other words, the best kind of show.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 9 Dec 2017 - 7:22

Story 251-In The Forest of the Night

"There are very good solid scientific reasons for being really quite frightened now."
The Scene: Some wolves appear and then bugger off.
Why it works: I'm sorry, but I can't. I know the point of this blog was to highlight the outstanding moment in every episode, but I really don't have anything nice to say about this awful mess. I truly despise this episode more than any other, and the only reason I chose this scene was because, for a few seconds, it has a sense of threat. There is literally no plot to this s***. Some trees pop up, protect us from a fireball, disappear, the end. There's nothing for the characters to do apart from wait for things to clear up, maybe stop a few guys from chopping them down. Not even Capaldi can be bothered with this script, and it's genuinely painful to spend 45 minutes with these kids. The title music is so out of sync it hurts, and the set design is sparse. And what the f*** is that ending?! I really can't go on any more. Sorry today's entry is so short, but I hate to be negative, and anything else I've got to say is just more of the same. Let's truly hope we never get an episode like this again.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 10 Dec 2017 - 20:19

For the first time since The Rebel Flesh/The Almost People in 2011, we have a two parter, which means a double entry today! Enjoy!

Story 252.1-Dark Water

"Well, I couldn't very well keep calling myself the Master, now could I?"
The Scene: Jaws drop around the country as we learn the truth about Missy.
Why it works: Well, it's an obvious choice, isn't it? A genuinely legendary scene in Doctor Who history, as that long time antagonist the Master becomes a woman. I feel sorry for fans who've joined us in the last few years, because they'll never know how this felt at the time. The Master! Is a woman! It felt like the most scandalous and biggest change ever in Doctor Who. Well, apart from when William Hartnell became Patrick Troughton, or when the Cybermen came back, or when John Hurt was not the Doctor. My point is, the show thrives on change. If nothing had ever changed, it would have been dead after three years. But then again, change isn't always a good thing-the schedules of BBC One after 6th December 1989 wasn't a good one. Fortunately, Missy was a brilliant change. By turning the villain on their head in such a drastic fashion, we got to see a whole new side to her. The evil schemes of her past selves were there, the self-conscious campiness, but we also got to see her emotional side for the first time. Who would have thought back in 1971 that a wicked, bearded man could turn into such a deep character with a real friendship with the Doctor? Who could have thought that the person who was once Anthony Ainley could make an audience cry with a heart breaking death scene? Who would have thought a character who was once Derek Jacobi could kill an audience favourite character and make it a funny scene? Not all changes are good, but this one was, and I think we're all praying the big change on Christmas Day will be as successful as this one was.

Honourable Mentions-
"Can you please just put me back on the phone to Danny?"
Danny Pink is killed in one of the most shocking cold opens seen in a while, which gives the phenomenal Rachel Talalay her first chance to show off her directing talent.

"Do you think I care for you so little that betraying me would make a difference?"
Clara destroys all seven TARDIS keys in a tense scene which showcases the talent of our two regulars.

"Don't cremate me. Don't cremate me."
A horrific scene which pushes the boundaries of what Doctor Who can do in tremendous fashion. Mary Whitehouse would have had a field day with this one.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 10 Dec 2017 - 20:33

Story 252.2-Death in Heaven

"Ahem. I'm going to kill you in a minute. I'm not even kidding."
The Scene: Missy kills Osgood. *cries*
Why it works: Missy really is so fine. I know I spent the last entry talking about her, but she's so fine she not only blows my mind, but I'm going to ramble about her again, so there. This is the scene where I fell in love with Missy, which I never expected to say, because I love Osgood too. Really though, I suppose it makes sense, because they're probably the best performances from these remarkable women, because they show them as real, fully rounded characters, and not the clichéd stereotypes they could have easily been. Osgood gets some backbone. She isn't a clever clogs with problems, she stands up to somebody she knows could, and does, kill her, with some seriously impressive gusto and believability. And then that bitch goes and kills her. At the start of the scene, Missy is playing it for comedy, tied up and taking the piss out of pop songs. And by the end, she's the most wicked, despised character in the Whoniverse-aka the perfect Master. She's cruel, and she knows it. She knows how to annoy the heck out of the regulars. She's completely mad yet composed. Doctor Who has a new Queen. Say something nice.

Honourable Mentions-
"I'm the Doctor."
Clara gives the finger to the haters in a gloriously different scene which plays around with the titles in a really fun way.

"Oh! Permission to squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!"
The Doctor free-falls into the TARDIS in one of the show's most exciting scenes, and that classic of the Rachel Talalay episode, the Doctor falling (here, Heaven Sent, The Doctor Falls (well, at least metaphorically))

"This is not the order of a general, nor the whim of a lunatic."
Danny sacrifices himself in a scene which uses its longevity to its dramatic advantage, which also sees a happy ending as Kate is saved and the Brigadier is waved off.

"Never trust a hug. It's just a way to hide your face."
The Doctor says goodbye to Clara, and not for the last time, in a lovely scene with just a nice touch of darkness to end the episode-or so it would seem, Santa cameo not withstanding.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 11 Dec 2017 - 17:15

Story 253-Last Christmas

"This is your mind trying to tell you this isn't real."
The Scene: The Doctor realises why Santa is there-because nothing around them is real...
Why it works: This is a bit of a marmite episode-lots of people find it engaging and innovative, whilst an equal amount find it dull and repetitive. Sorry if you disagree, but I belong to the first group. Not only is this one of my favourite Christmas specials, it might be one of my favourite Capaldi episodes, because it takes the tropes associated with the Christmas Who story and uses them in the familiar way whilst also serving up a darn good tale which could be watched at any time of the year-the festive spirit only helps when it's near Christmas. I can't tell you how much I love this underrate gem. The plot is so intricate. Rather than Santa being there to shove the festive spirit down your throat, it's to help the Doctor and co realise they're still dreaming. How terrifying is the thought that, when you think you're okay, there's an ugly face thing eating your life essence? The design is superb-every detail of the monsters and the sets are so believable. The characters are so layered and deep every one of them is companion worthy. It makes references without being pretentious. The plot is so intricate there are tons of little touches which make everything click upon a rewatch. The writing and cinematography make it a pleasure to enjoy. There is tons I could say about this, and I wouldn't even know how to begin, so I'll end it by saying again that this is one of the best, and most underrated, Christmas episodes of the bunch, packed with memorable scenes and feel good moments, without losing any of Who's traditional scares.

Honourable Mentions-

"Oh, that noise. Never realised how much I loved it."
The Doctor and Clara are reunited in a literal cold open which sets the fast pace for this fun story.

"Here comes your earworm."
Shona defeats the monsters by dancing to Slade. One of Who's funniest, and most unique, scenes.

"I've always believed in Santa Claus. But he looks a little different to me."
The Doctor and Clara ride with Santa in a heart warming scene where only the most miserable miser would fail to feel festive.

"We should do this every Christmas."
Every 11/Clara shipper in the country cries as the Doctor helps old Clara to pull a cracker.

Note-Just a warning, from tomorrow, two episode will be covered every day-this is because I want to get to The Doctor Falls by Christmas Eve so I can write about Twice Upon a Time after broadcast, but it also makes sense seeing as Series 9 is mostly two parters anyway, and nearly half of the Series 10 episodes are part of multi episode stories, so it's not like I'm breaking the one story a day rule that much. In addition, The Husbands of River Song/The Return of Doctor Mysterio day, 18th December, will see a mini entry on Class, with a brief appraisal of each of its eight episodes sandwiched between the specials. Hope you're all enjoying the blog anyway, and see you here tomorrow for The Magician's Apprentice and The Witch's Familiar!
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 12 Dec 2017 - 12:41

Story 254.1-The Magician's Apprentice

"Davros. My name is Davros."
The Scene: The Doctor tries to save a young boy from the Hand Mines.
Why it works: Another obvious choice for the standout scene, simply because, at just two years old, it's already become iconic. In one of the most exciting cold opens in recent years, we're reminded of the power Doctor Who has to shock because, although this was guessed right by some of the tabloids, it was unexpected, and that instantly made the whole episode all the more gripping. Although this is far too fan pleasing for a season opener (I suspect many would have turned off after those brilliant titles), it is good at times to have little indulgences like this. They add to the show's already rich mythology without taking away from it, and, at times (here included), foreknowledge makes the scene all the more engrossing-we know the Doctor has a moral dilemma here, and the viewer is instantly waiting for the end of the story to see what he does about it. This might not be one of the strongest season openers, but for a fan of the Doctor and Davros, it's certainly one of the most interesting.

Honourable Mentions-
"One of those was a lie. Can you guess which one?"
Missy makes a remarkable return to form in a scene with her fun, flirty personality written all over it.

"Hugging is a great way to hide your face."
The Doctor and Clara reunite in a long scene which never outstays its welcome, being equally packed with comedy, drama and heartfelt moments.

"Is this not life at its purest?"
Davros gleefully taunts the Doctor as both Missy and Clara are bumped off, leading into one of the best recent cliffhangers.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 12 Dec 2017 - 12:52

Story 254.2-The Witch's Familiar

"Yes, I know that you're a Dalek! Where is Clara Oswald?"
The Scene: The Doctor nearly exterminates Clara-Dalek.
Why it works: One thing I've noted reviewing these episodes for this blog is that, especially in the Capaldi era, Who can take a long scene and use its length for dramatics as far as it can, which is showed perfectly here. Take the restaurant scene in Deep Breath, or Death in Heaven's graveyard stand off. Those scenes must be some of the longest in the show's history, but also some of the tension. You can hear the breathing (or not) in the room as the Doctor realises all the diners are Clockwork Robots, or feel Clara's anger as Danny sacrifices himself. And now, this brilliant scene ramps up the tension as the Doctor nearly kills his companion. It's such a brutal thought, but it nearly happens, not only giving the show another chance to show off its fantastic leads, but giving Missy a chance to show her evil side, seeing as she's spent most of the story in frenemy mode. But it also serves a purpose to the plot-this makes the Doctor realise that the Daleks maybe do have some sort of better half, tying into the cliffhanger resolution right at the end of the episode in one of the programme's most timey-wimey twists. An unexpected and gripping highlight of an action packed episode.

Honourable Mentions-
"Because he always assumes he's going to win."
Missy explains to Clara how they survived in one of the most thrilling title sequences ever, which includes a pre-Heaven Sent reference to that masterpiece to boot.

"Admit it. You've all had this exact nightmare."
The Doctor rocks up in Davros' chair in a glorious screwing of the rules of the show.

"You can't kill a Dalek with a brooch!"
Missy kills a Dalek. With a brooch. Proving Clara wrong. It takes the piss, but it's fab, and another reason I love Missy.

"Look, the sun's coming up. We're on the same side now."
Moffat does that impossible thing of making us care for Davros, as he again rips up the rules in a scene where Davros opens his eyes.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 13 Dec 2017 - 12:14

Story 255.1-Under the Lake

"So that writing is the co-ordinates?"
The Scene: The Doctor and co finally piece together the mystery about the ghosts.
Why it works: It may not seem like anything special, but I really admire this scene, because the writing is superb. Exposition is needed in everything, and it's a tricky thing to get right. Dump it all in one go, it becomes boring, spell it out too slowly, it becomes condescending-just two of the things this story had to avoid, because there's a lot of plot and not that much time to get it out in. Whilst it can seem slow on a rewatch, what I love about this story is it takes its time. Imagine how rushed this would have been as a 45 minute story-it'd be like 42, only a hell of a lot more confusing. But this scene sees the Doctor, on a rare occasion where he's as stumped as we are, slowly work out everything going on around them, and it creates an extra piece of immersion for the viewer as you realise the next part of the puzzle just as he does. This is Doctor Who at perhaps its most intelligent, an involving plot which unravels at the perfect pace, and with a traditional base-under-siege setting to boot.

Honourable Mentions-

"I'll do all I can to solve the death of your friend/family member/pet."
A funny scene which relieves the tension and is perfectly suited to this perhaps most alien of Doctors.

"You trust me, don't you, Clara?"
The Doctor and Clara are separated in a tense cliffhanger which also sees the Doctor reappear as a ghost.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 13 Dec 2017 - 12:25

Story 255.2-Before the Flood

"So there's this man. He has a time machine. Up and down history he goes, zip zip zip zip zip, getting into scrapes."
The Scene: Fandom up and down the country is confused as the Doctor talks to them.
Why it works: One of the things I love about the Capaldi era is the way it breaks the rules. Before Deep Breath, there were probably tons of fans who said things like: You can't have Matt Smith back an episode after he left! A good Dalek? Stories with no monsters? A female Master? Clara as the Doctor? Surprise return of Davros? An episode with just the Doctor? A three parter? Return of the male Master? Hartnell? A female Doctor? I could go on, but I've made my point. The point is, this wonderful cold open takes all the rules of Doctor Who, and screws them. The Doctor talks to the audience. Not to Clara via a POV, not via some video diary thing, to you. Mr Doctor Who fan is at home, having a one sided conversation with Peter Capaldi-how amazing! And then, that theme tune! Messing about with that tune is probably sacrilege to some fans, but it makes it more exciting, and the show as a whole more unpredictable. Rather than listening to the same music week in, week out, we get a wonderful rock version of the iconic piece-which the Doctor plays, so does that mean he knows he has a theme song? He knows there's a show? Is his name really Doctor Who? This innovative piece of television encourages us to think more deeply about the show's world, and it definitely sets us up for a thrilling episode in store.

Honourable Mentions-

"To keep an eye on you, you idiot."
O'Donnell dies in a touching and rare scene which brings the threat back to the show in style.

"Cass. Cass. Idiot. I'm an idiot."
Clara looks for Cass in a tense, otherwise silent scene which utilises some of the best cinematography the show has ever seen.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 14 Dec 2017 - 17:08

Now, I'm going to cheat a little bit with the numbering today. Officially, The Girl Who Died and The Woman Who Lived are separate stories, a linked pair of one shots at the most, whilst Heaven Sent and Hell Bent are officially a two parter. I simply can't class that masterpiece as part of the same story as that abomination, and I've always felt those two, along with Face the Raven, are linked single part stories. So today's stories will be grouped as 256, the Zygons tomorrow as 257, Sleep No More as 258, and so on, until The Husbands of River Song at 262, returning to the official numbering system. Glad we've got that sorted.

Story 256.1-The Girl Who Died

"Who frowned me this face? Why this one?"
The Scene: The Doctor realises where he's seen himself before.
Why it works: Now, it's undeniable that Doctor Who isn't as mainstream as it used to be. It's a sad fact that viewing figures and merchandise are down, but I'm always the optimist, and the positive side of this is that it can now be made for the fans. Other shows like Casualty don't bother to have some elaborate explanation as to why different characters look like the same actor, especially if their appearance was seven years ago. But Doctor Who is different. Fans wouldn't accept a clumsy line or two shoving it under the carpet, so what does it do? Turn it into a plot arc taking place over a year, making it a clever part of the narrative and including a flashback to an almost decade old episode to boot. Whovians might be a bit on the obsessive side every now and then, but it's tough to not admire our fandom for its genuine ingenuity.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 14 Dec 2017 - 17:15

Story 256.2-The Woman Who Lived

"Clutching toys as they sleep, never to wake up. My children. My screams. I could not save you, little ones."
The Scene: The Doctor reads Ashildr's journals, and discovers what she's been up to since they last met.
Why it works: I've spoken a lot in this blog, my own journal if you will, about how comedy is useful to alleviate the darkest of stories, but it's also true that a touch of darkness is useful to make the comedies all the more serious. In this unusually dark romp packed with jokes (literally every line the hilarious Rufus Hound says), it's a nice touch to have this scene which really explores the impact of Ashildr's immortality. The ideas are genuinely interesting and encourage you to think more deeply about the world and, as I'm sure you may remember from my 50th Anniversary posts, I love it when that darker side of the Doctor is explored, and we see what happens to the people he leaves behind. It might not be a standout episode of the season, but this is one of the most fascinating scenes in a series packed with outstanding moments.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 15 Dec 2017 - 14:02

Story 257.1-The Zygon Invasion

"The invasion has happened, you're probably surrounded by Zygons."
The Scene: The Doctor gets an alarming phone call from Clara.
Why it works: I can't tell you how much I love this story, and it would probably be my favourite Capaldi story if Heaven Sent and World Enough and Time/The Doctor Falls weren't so damn good. I could have put the whole script as a golden moment, but this scene encapsulates the reason it's so great because this is certainly the most adult Doctor Who ever. The Pertwee era might have used subtle analogies, but this masterpiece uses Zygons as a full blown metaphor for what's happening with ISIS, and as a result is one of the most genuinely terrifying stories ever. I admire the show for being brave enough to put something as controversial as this on primetime BBC One, not just because it's refusing to be submissive according to BBC guidelines or whatever, but also because it's great for children as well as adults. As a society, we greatly underestimate children and their intelligence, and there were likely a large number who didn't understand the news before this episode made it clear to them, which is why I loved Newsround when I was younger. It took serious stories and helped me to understand them. What other show would have a plane explosion for its cliffhanger, or child execution videos, or terror across the world? One of the truly most innovative pieces of TV of this generation, and an aspirational target as to what good Doctor Who should be.

Honourable Mentions-

"That is not your mother, that is an alien hostile."
A tense and dramatic scene showing just what the Zygons are capable of.

"This is a trap! This is an ambush!"
Jac meets her demise in a genuinely surprising twist which sees Bonnie reveal her true form.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 15 Dec 2017 - 14:13

Story 257.2-The Zygon Inversion

"Sit down and talk!"
The Scene: The Doctor's greatest speech.
Why it works: This is undeniably one of the greatest scenes in Doctor Who. Fact. The police box in the junkyard; "Do I have the right?", "Is this Death?"; "Run!", "All thirteen!", four and a half billion years, and this-the classics of Doctor Who. Other writers will spend a lifetime trying to write something as good as this complete masterpiece, and simply fail. It's surely got to be one of the longest scenes in Doctor Who history too, but, again, it uses this to its advantage. The absence of anything extra like music or effects, and almost ten minutes of Peter Capaldi's perfect voice, makes this one of the most engrossing pieces of TV ever created. And, like the last episode, it makes a potentially tricky subject understandable and relatable. This is the closest anybody could possibly get to understanding war without actually being in it, and this chilling speech reminds us what the Doctor has been through, and sums up more than ever what he's been through in his extraordinarily long life. Peter Capaldi is definitely one of the best Doctors ever, and with only ten days of his brilliance left, and an hour more of his performance left to enjoy, everybody should appreciate this remarkable man whilst we can. He isn't just a Doctor, he's the Doctor-the original, you might say.

Honourable Mentions-
"I am calling your bluff. You need me alive."
Clara talks to herself in another tense and genius scene unlike anything ever seen in the show before.

"There it is, Osgood. There's their plan."
A Zygon commits suicide in one of the brilliantly dark scenes this episode is littered with.

"Oh, and you should know. I'm a very big fan."
A sweet farewell for Osgood, one of the most original and relatable characters the show's ever had.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 16 Dec 2017 - 19:58

Story 258-Sleep No More

"Compulsive viewing. I did tell you not to watch."
The Scene: If only I knew....
Why it works: Here's a confession. You know all those stories every fan hates? Time Flight, The Twin Dilemma, Love and Monsters, The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe? I love them all, and I love this one too. I honestly don't understand why people have a problem with it. Alright, it might not make perfect sense, but that's the genius of it-it encourages you to think, something TV nowadays so sadly does little of, and the clever twists which keep on coming make it mind blowingly engrossing. It's another reminder that things carry on after the Doctor has left-after he hops off in the TARDIS, the ship keeps going, and only then do we learn the full horror of Rassmussen's plan, and although it probably didn't, there's a genuinely chilling thought that it could have succeeded. How I'd love a sequel to this. And I can't talk about this episode without mentioning the innovative camerawork. Having a story told entirely by found footage, in real time, without even a title sequence, shows how Doctor Who always reinvents itself and, although not every reimagining works, I'd rather it try and fail than become complacent. After all, as Rachel Talalay once said, without ground-breaking episodes such as Heaven Sent (oh, I can't wait to write my entry for that tomorrow!), Doctor Who could easily be what so many people already think it is, some cheap time travel show with monsters.

Honourable Mention-
"Shakespeare. He really knew his stuff. They all did. The Ancients. The Poets."
The Doctor realises the truth in a classic Peter Capaldi speech, which can always make an episode outstanding.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 16 Dec 2017 - 20:10

Story 259-Face the Raven

"Let me be brave. Let me be brave."
The Scene: Clara faces her death.
Why it works: I still cry whenever I see this. Honestly, it just gets to me. Although it's an unpopular opinion, I love Clara and this is one of the most heart-breaking things I've ever seen on TV-and I wouldn't have it any other way. This fantastically involving story saw what happens when you think you know everything. Clara thought she was invincible, and immune to the Quantum Shade, so it was practically suicide when she took Rigsy's chronolock from him. It taught her a lesson that she'd gotten too big for her boots, it taught the audience a lesson to always be cautious and it taught the Doctor a lesson to be more caring of those he travels with. The goodbye between these two is brilliantly written and acted, being one of the most natural and best scenes seen in Doctor Who in recent years, and the actual death of Clara utilises cinematography and unusual sound design in ways unseen before, indicating just how brave the show's directors have been over the years. This scene reminds us that travelling with the Doctor isn't just laughs, it can be dangerous too, which is why Hell Bent made this scene a joke-it takes all that drama and fixes it with a casual how d'you do? attitude. Alright, so she dies eventually, but that doesn't mean that it didn't take the intense feeling out of this scene. The finality of this scene was what made it so unique and, regarding your opinions on the canonicity of Hell Bent, it still can be.

Honourable Mentions-
"Hello, London!"
Clara gets a last laugh in a flying TARDIS scene, always an impressive visual sight.

"Do you think a Cyberman fears a merciful death?"
An early example of the Raven's power in an exciting scene giving a mild thrill in a talkative episode.

"You'll find that it's a very small universe when I'm angry with you."
Peter Capaldi gives Ashildr and the audience chills at the end of an amazing episode.

Tomorrow-Prepare for a mammoth entry as I explain why Heaven Sent is the greatest piece of TV ever made. It might take me a while, appropriate given the nature of the story.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 17 Dec 2017 - 20:26

Story 260-Heaven Sent

DOCTOR [OC]: As you come into this world, something else is also born.
(Large cogwheels turn. We journey around a large stone building with leaded windows, narrow corridors, spiral staircases up tall towers, grills covering sets of large cogwheels set into the stonework, and every few yards screens hang on the walls, full of static.)
DOCTOR [OC]: You begin your life, and it begins a journey towards you. It moves slowly, but it never stops. Wherever you go, whatever path you take, it will follow. Never faster, never slower, always coming. You will run. It will walk. You will rest. It will not. One day, you will linger in the same place too long. You will sit too still or sleep too deep, and when, too late, you rise to go, you will notice a second shadow next to yours. Your life will then be over.

[Teleport chamber room]

(In a large room containing a teleport (note- not a transmat) chamber and its separate control console, a blackened hand reaches for a lever, squeezes the grip to release it, and pulls. The owner of the hand gasps and falls, cogs turn, and the hand turns to dust. Light fills the teleport chamber and the Doctor appears, coughing and gasping. The machinery slows and stops. He opens the curved perspex door of the teleport chamber and steps out, closing it behind him. He remembers the moment the Quantum Shade raven entered Clara's body, then scoops a handful of sand from the floor and lets it trickle though his fingers.)
DOCTOR: If you think because she is dead, I am weak, then you understand very little. If you were any part of killing her, and you're not afraid, then you understand nothing at all. So, for your own sake, understand this. I am the Doctor. I'm coming to find you, and I will never, ever stop.

[Tower]

(The Doctor cautiously leaves the room and goes anticlockwise along a curved corridor with deep square openings cut in the outer wall to admit light. He leans out of one to see the shadows of spokes cast on the ground far below. Then he looks up at the outside of a tall tower.)
DOCTOR: The equipment in that room is consistent with an augmented ultra long-range teleport. So, I'm not more than a single light year from where I was, and I'm in the same time zone.
(He looks up out of another opening at the sky then across a courtyard at more towers. Then he starts to walk back clockwise.)
DOCTOR: When the sun sets, I'll be able to establish an exact position by the stars. Then you'll have a choice. Come out, show yourself, or keep on hiding. Clara said I shouldn't take revenge. You should know, I don't always listen.
(He finds a spade with soil on it leaning against the inner wall.)
DOCTOR: Oh, what's this? Well, are you gardeners? I hate gardening! What sort of a person has a power complex about flowers? It's dictatorship for inadequates. Or to put it another way, it's dictatorship. Come on! Chop, chop! The Doctor will see you now! Show me what you've got! I just watched my best friend die in agony. My day can't get any worse. Let's see what we can do about yours!
(A black and white circular image forms on the screens. It is a view of him, from someone looking through a narrow slit in a wall. He looks out of the nearest opening at the wall across the courtyard. It has narrow slit openings, and there is a figure in pale grey veils standing at one of them, presumable the Veil of the cast list. He backs away and checks the view on the nearest screen. The hunchbacked figure turns away from the slit and moves along the corridor. According to the screens, the being moves slowly, as if it is dragging a leg. Each step is a thump, and they get closer. The Doctor wafts away a fly, then retreats from the approaching sounds. He runs down a narrow corridor to a wooden door, but it is locked. He is about to run back, but the being is at the other end of the bridge.)
DOCTOR: I know you. I've seen you before.
(He runs back to the door and puts both hands on it.)
DOCTOR: I used to know a trick, back when I was young and telepathic. Clearly, you can't make an actual psychic link with a door, for one very obvious reason. They're notoriously cross. I mean, imagine life as a door. People keep pushing past you. All of that knocking, but it's never for you. And you get locked up every night, so if you're just a little bit nice.
(The door unlocks.)
DOCTOR: See, Clara? Still got it.
(He opens the door to reveal a solid wall just a pace behind it. The Veil has almost arrived.)
DOCTOR: But I. Er,  I can't actually see a way out of this  I've finally run out of corridor. There's a life summed up. Oh, now this is new. I'm scared. I just realised that I'm actually scared of dying.
(The Veil has arrived, and is just reaching out with its four-fingered hands, when it stops dead, with a clang.)
DOCTOR: Something I said? What did I say?
(Even the Veil's attendant flies are frozen in the air. He flicks one away.)
DOCTOR: Why did you stop?
(There is a loud cracking and rumbling of cogs. He looks out of an opening to see a sections of the walls rotating in opposite directions with the uppermost faster than the lower ones, rather like the upper section of the Tardis time rotor does nowadays. The obstructing wall moves aside and he runs into the revealed room.)

[Bedroom]

(The cogs stop. The Doctor tests the springs in the bed then picks one of the stems of hemerocallis from a vase by the window and sniffs it. Then he sees a portrait hanging over the fireplace, it's paint and varnish old and cracked and peeling. It is, of course, a painting of Clara Oswald. He picks up a jeweller's eyeglass that is conveniently by the frame and examines the state of the oils, not noticing that the screen in the room shows him examining the painting. The Veil is arriving.)
DOCTOR: Old. Very old. Possibly very, very old.
(Then he sees a fly land on the portrait. He drops the glass from his eye and turns to face the Veil.)
DOCTOR: When I was a very little boy, there was an old lady who died. (cheek pop) They covered her in veils, but it was a hot, sunny day, and the flies came. It gave me nightmares for years. So, who's been stealing my nightmares?
(He plucks petals from the flowers.)
DOCTOR: What am I here for? You've known about me for a very long time, right?
(He puts the eyeglass back in and dodges around to see if the Veil can actually see him.)
DOCTOR: So, what is it? Is it a trap? Is it a prison? No! Is it a torture chamber? Am I right? Somebody really should know better. Anyone who can put all of this together and steal my bad dreams, they should know better.
(He lets the jeweller's eyeglass fall to the floor with a metallic clatter.)
DOCTOR: The secrets I have? No chance. No telling, not me.
(He ducks under the veiled being's arms and grabs a wooden stool to fend it off.)
DOCTOR; I told you I was scared of dying. And I wasn't lying either. Advantage, me!
(He throws the stool through a leaded window. The wind is blowing.)
DOCTOR: Because you won't see
this
coming!
(The Doctor dives through the broken window...)

[Tardis]

(And bursts in through the doors. He goes to the console, pushing the scanner screen aside and working controls. We get intercut shots of him plummeting ever downwards.)
DOCTOR: Sorry I'm late. Jumped out of a window. Certain death. Don't you want to know how I survived? Go on. Ask me! No, of course I had to jump! The first rule of being interrogated is that you are the only irreplaceable person in the torture chamber. The room is yours, so work it. If they're going to threaten you with death, show them who's boss. Die faster. And you've seen me do that more often than most. Isn't that right, Clara? Rule one of dying, don't. Rule two, slow down.
(The Doctor slows to almost no movement in mid-fall. There is a figure in the Tardis with her back to him.)
DOCTOR: You've got the rest of your life. The faster you think, the slower it will pass. Concentrate. Assume you're going to survive. Always assume that. Imagine you've already survived. There's a storm room in your mind. Lock the door and think. This is my storm room. I always imagine that I'm back in my Tardis, showing off, telling you how I escaped, making you laugh. That's what I'm doing right now. I am falling, Clara. I'm dying. And I am going to explain to you how I survived. I can't wait to hear what I say. I'm nothing without an audience.
One hope. Salt.
(The stool smashes the window.)
DOCTOR: Thought I smelled it earlier. When I broke the window, I was sure. Salty air. This castle is standing in the sea.
(A schematic is on the scanner.)
DOCTOR:  Diving into water from a great height is no guarantee of survival. I need to know exactly how far I'm going to fall, and how fast.
(Calculations are scrolling up the scanner as the top of the time rotor turns.)
DOCTOR: Why do you think I threw the stool? (breaking glass) Fall time to impact (splash) seven seconds.
DOCTOR [bedroom]: Because you won't see this coming!
DOCTOR: The wind resistance of the stool, the atmospheric density, (the petals falling) the strength of the local gravity. (the fall of the jeweller's glass.) Am I spoiling the magic? I work at this stuff, you know? Should hit the water in about
(The Doctor stretches out his arms into a dive.)
DOCTOR: Point zero two seconds. The chances of remaining conscious are
(Splash! The Doctor enters the water and gently floats downwards. The Tardis has gone dark, then lights up again, roundel layer by roundel layer. Someone is writing on a blackboard with chalk.)
BLACKBOARD: Question 1. What is this place?
DOCTOR: Can't I just sleep?
BLACKBOARD: Question 2. What did you say that made the creature stop?
DOCTOR: Do I have to know everything?
BLACKBOARD: How are you going to
DOCTOR: Clara, I can't always
BLACKBOARD: Win?? (with seven underlines.)

(Filtered sunlight reveals that the sea bed is covered in long humanoid skulls. Fully conscious again, the Doctor swims up to the surface and gasps for breath. A short time later he has climbed out. The castle has a central tower with four spokes coming off it on two levels, connecting to the outer circular wall. From above it looks rather like a cog wheel.
Dripping wet, he walks up a staircase into a room with a roaring log fire. There are a pair of boots in front of the hearth, and trousers, jacket, waistcoat, shirt all on a wooden clothes horse to the side. The Doctor warms himself briefly, then compares the cuff buttons on the dry jacket with his own. They are identical. He exchanges his wet clothes for the dry ones. After a brief pause he puts his wet garments back exactly where he found the dry ones, and stands both boots up.
From the drying room, he walks through the great hall - of Caerphilly Castle - with a dining table set for one in the middle and on into a...

[Storeroom]

(This storeroom with a hexagon shaped hole in the flagstones, and chalked arrows pointing in towards each side. He touches the sand in the bottom of it.)
DOCTOR: It keeps coming, Clara. Wherever I go, it follows. Why? Why does it do that?
BLACKBOARD: Wrong question.
DOCTOR: Always the teacher. What's the right question, then?
BLACKBOARD: Not why. What?
DOCTOR: It's following me. Wherever I go, it's tracking me. Slowly though. Scary lurching. Scary. These screens, everywhere. It's showing me exactly where it is all the time, how far it's got, how near. Because it's trying to scare me. Putting its breath on my neck. That's the point. That's what it's doing. This is theatre. It's all about fear. Working hypothesis. I'm in a fully automated haunted house. A mechanical maze.
(A copper pan hanging up rattles.)
DOCTOR: It's a killer puzzle box designed to scare me to death, and I'm trapped inside it. (laughs) Must be Christmas.
(Heavy doors open somewhere. The Doctor walks out into a dark corridor. Water drips somewhere. He opens a creaky door into -)

[Garden]

(The trees and shrubs look nearly dead in the near permanent shade of the tiny inner courtyard. The door slams shut behind him, making him jump. A bell is ringing somewhere. The garden is laid out with a cogwheel design to the paths. At the centre is an empty round bed with a recently dug rectangle in the middle, like a screwdriver slot. The Doctor feels the quality of the worked soil, then sees a clean spade leaning against the wall.)
DOCTOR: Another spade? Someone wants me to dig. What do you think, Clara? Is someone trying to give me a hint? What would you do?
BLACKBOARD: Same as you.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, of course you would.
(He takes the spade.)
DOCTOR: Which, let's be honest, is what killed you. So, someone is trying to tell me that there's something important buried in this garden. That's almost the first thing they tried to tell me. Could be a trick. Could be one of my predecessors. Because I'm not the first prisoner here, am I! All those skulls! Wonder where they all went wrong. Building this height, creature that slow, so what? An hour.
(He excavates the dug soil as the Veil and its attendant flies come closer. When one buzzes his face, he runs to a window to check the screen inside. It is a view of a piece of wood with flies on it. So he opens the door, and the Veil is there, screeching at him. The Doctor slams the door, trapping its hands, until it finally withdraws them. He jams the spade under the door handle, digging its blade into the gravel path.)
DOCTOR: Physics of a triangle. You lose.
(The door stops shaking and the Veil leaves.)
DOCTOR: So? It can set traps. That's okay. I'm good at traps.
(Nervously he checks the view on the screen. It is the storeroom with its hexagon in the floor.)
DOCTOR: So, where are you off to? Only one way in and one way out. Well, seeing as you're going.
(He retrieves the spade, jumps back into the hole and carries on digging. As night falls and crickets chirp, he is about four foot down and tired, so he pauses to look up at the dark sky.)
DOCTOR: No, no. That's not right.
(The spade hits something. Sounds like stone by the scrape. He uses his hands to clear the remaining soil so he can read what has been carved into it. I Am. He recalls the hexagon. Flies start to buzz as he uncovers. In 12. A fly buzzes in front of him, then the Veil jumps down into the grave-sized hole. The Doctor falls backwards as it reaches for him.)

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: Well, that was another close one. Or it will have been, once I've been and gone and got myself out of it. So, how am I going to do that? Come on, teacher, ask me questions!
(The back of the woman moves aside to reveal what she has written on the blackboard.)
BLACKBOARD: Tell no lies.
DOCTOR [tower]: I'm actually scared of dying.
BLACKBOARD: Question 2. What did you say that made the creature stop?
DOCTOR: The truth, yes. But not any old truth, Clara. This whole place is designed to terrify me. I'm being interrogated. It's not just truth it wants. That's not enough. It's confession. I have to tell truths I've never told before. That's the only thing that stops it. You see, the problem is, Clara, there are truths that I can never tell. Not for anything. But I'm scared and I'm alone. Alone, and very, very scared.
(He sits on the steps to the gallery.)
DOCTOR: I confess.

[Garden]

DOCTOR: I didn't leave Gallifrey because I was bored! That was a lie! It's always been a lie!
(The Veil pauses.)
DOCTOR: Not enough? You want more? I was scared! I ran because I was scared! Is that what you want me to say? Is that true enough for you?
(The Veil withdraws its hand, the castle rumbles. The Doctor climbs out of the grave to see the various floors rotating in opposite directions again. He runs inside then through to the wall on the outside of the castle, and looks out across the endless sea. A pair of skulls are dislodged from the seabed and float to the surface. The castle stops moving and they drift back down again.)

[Bedroom]

(A clock ticks, but it is actually the Doctor tapping a finger against the arm of his chair.)
DOCTOR [OC]: It's funny, the day you lose someone isn't the worst. At least you've got something to do. It's all the days they stay dead.
(The flies arrive.)
DOCTOR: Fifty seven minutes?
(He gets up and leaves just ahead of the Veil's arrival. )

(Tapping the bannister of a big staircase.)
DOCTOR [OC]: This is how my world works, Clara. I tick off the seconds as they pass.
My life is a countdown.
(A door thuds. He runs down and through a long gallery to another big room.)
DOCTOR [OC]: If I draw the creature to one extreme of the castle, and I run to the other extreme, I can earn myself a maximum of eighty two minutes. Eighty two minutes to eat, sleep and work. My work is finding Room 12. (He goes through door 46) The castle wants me to. It's luring me. (He checks his notebook.) The numbering is a bit confused, (backs away from door 7) as if the rooms are all jumbled up. Maybe they move around. I saw the whole castle move, when I made the creature stop.
(Back in the garden, the grave is filled in again.)
DOCTOR [OC]: Every room, if I leave it long enough, reverts to its condition at the moment I arrive. It tidies up after itself.
(The flowers are in the bedroom vase, intact. He remembers plucking the petals.)
DOCTOR [OC]: Automated room service.
(He has a meal in the Great Hall, soup served in a pewter dish, which he eats with a pewter spoon. A metal goblet and a plate of bread rolls are also on the fabric place mat.)
DOCTOR [OC]: I think this whole place is inside a closed energy loop, constantly recycling. Or maybe I'm in Hell? That's okay. I'm not scared of Hell. It's just Heaven for bad people. But how long will I have to be here? Forever?
(He lets the spoon drop. From a corridor above the Great Hall he sees the Veil near the table.)
DOCTOR [OC]: It's always coming. Always closer. The countdown never stops. But the countdown to what?

[Teleport chamber room]

DOCTOR [OC]: There are two events in everybody's life that nobody remembers. Two moments experienced by every living thing, yet no one remembers anything about them. Nobody remembers being born and nobody remembers dying.
(He finds a skull with power leads attached to its temples on the floor by the control console, and picks it up. Alas, poor Yorick.)
DOCTOR [OC]: Is that why we always stare into the eye sockets of a skull?
(He removes the power leads and stands.)
DOCTOR [OC]: Because we're asking, what was it like? Does it hurt? Are you still scared?
(He sees a word written in the sand or dust.)
DOCTOR: Bird? What's bird got to do with it? Are there birds here?
(The cogs start turning and the word disappears. A piece of wall slides away to reveal the entrance to a spiral staircase.)

[Tower]

(The Doctor climbs the steps to the battlements at the top of the tower, and places Yorick in a crenellation overlooking the sea.)
DOCTOR [OC]: There's something I'm missing, Clara, and I think it's something terrible.
(He looks up at the stars. Back inside the tower, he hears a door open and close, and heads down some steps to find a door labelled 12. He opens it, but the way into the room beyond is blocked by masonry. Light streams through the gap on the left hand side.)
DOCTOR: Hello? Hello, is there someone there? Hello!
DOCTOR [OC]: It's a trap, Clara. A lure and a trap.
(The Doctor's head morphs into Yorick up on the battlements and he looks at the stars again.)
DOCTOR: I'm following breadcrumbs laid out for me. This is somebody's game, and I can't stop playing. A game everybody else has lost. I know how to move that wall, Clara, so long as I don't run out of confessions. But what I really want to know is
(Flies buzz.)
DOCTOR: Who's been playing about with the stars? They're all in the wrong places, for this time zone, anyway. I know I didn't time travel to get here. I can feel time travel.
(The Veil is coming up behind him.)
DOCTOR: If I didn't know better, I'd say I've travelled seven thousand years into the future. But I do know better. So who moved the stars?
(The Veil reaches its hands either side of his face.)
DOCTOR: The Hybrid.
(The Veil pauses and he turns around to face it.)
DOCTOR: Long before the Time War, the Time Lords knew it was coming, like a storm on the wind. There were many prophecies and stories, legends before the fact. One of them was about a creature called the Hybrid. Half Dalek, half Time Lord, the ultimate warrior. But whose side would it be on? Would it bring peace or destruction? Was it real, or a fantasy? I confess, I know the Hybrid is real. I know where it is, and what it is. I confess, I'm afraid.
(The Veil leaves and the castle reconfigures. The rumbling shakes Yorick off the battlements and it plummets into the sea to join all the other identical skulls.)

[Room 12]

(The Doctor runs back down the stairs and opens the doors. The masonry blocking the way has gone. As he enters, he slaps his fingers against his palm to count the seconds. The Veil is coming. The Doctor walks down the smooth narrow passage and puts his sonic sunglasses on. He takes them off when he reaches the wall of crystal at the far end with the word Home carved in it. But the word disappears after a few moments. A dark rectangular shape can just be made out through the crystal.)
DOCTOR: Of course. The last square on the board. What else would it be? The Tardis. One confession away.
(He puts the sunglasses back on.)
DOCTOR: Azbantium. Four hundred times harder than diamond. Twenty feet thick. The way out.
(He remembers the word in the dust in the teleport chamber room.)
DOCTOR: Bird?

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: (angry) That's when I remember! Always then. Always then. Always exactly then! I can't keep doing this, Clara! I can't! Why is it always me? Why is it never anybody else's turn?
BLACKBOARD: How are you going to win?? (seven underlines.)
DOCTOR: Can't I just lose? Just this once?
(He hides under the time rotor assembly.)
DOCTOR; Easy. It would be easy. It would be so easy. Just tell them. Just tell them, whoever wants to know, all about the Hybrid.
(The Doctor is sitting on the ground in a channel cut part way through the Azbantium, as the Veil arrives in room 12. In the Tardis, in his head, he comes out and runs around the console room.)
DOCTOR: I can't keep doing this. I can't! I can't always do this! It's not fair! Clara, it's just not fair! Why can't I just lose?
BLACKBOARD: No!
DOCTOR: But I can remember, Clara.You don't understand, I can remember it all. Every time. And you'll still be gone. Whatever I do, you still won't be there.
(He sits on the stairs to the lower level, distraught.)
CLARA [OC]: Doctor, you are not the only person who ever lost someone. It's the story of everybody. Get over it. Beat it. Break free. 
(Her hand touches his cheek.)
CLARA:
Doctor, it's time. Get up, off your arse, and win!

[Room 12]

(The Doctor stands to face the Veil as it enters the room.)
DOCTOR; Hello again. No more confessions, sorry. But I will tell you the truth.
(The Doctor punches the Azbantium wall, and cries out in pain.)
DOCTOR: The Hybrid is a very dangerous secret. A very, very dangerous secret and it needs to be kept!
(Another punch, another cry of pain.)
DOCTOR: So I'm telling you nothing. Nothing at all. Instead, I'm going to do something far worse. (punch) Argh! I'm going to get out of here, and find whoever put me here in the first place, and whatever they're trying to do, I'm going to stop it! (punch) Argh!
(The Doctor doubles over in pain.)
DOCTOR: But it might take me a little while, so do you want me to tell you a story? (punch) Argh! The Brothers Grimm, lovely fellas. They're on my darts team. (punch) Argh! According to them, there's this emperor and he asks this shepherd's boy, how many seconds in eternity?
(The Veil's scaly hands close across the Doctor's eyes and he screams as steam rises from his skin then falls to the ground. The Veil is teleported away and the screens revert to static. Silence reigns.)

[Tardis]

The Doctor's storm room slowly lights up.)
DOCTOR: People always get it wrong with Time Lords. We take forever to die. Even if we're too injured to regenerate, every cell in our bodies keeps trying. Dying properly can take days. That's why we like to die among our own kind. They know not to bury us early.
(The mortally injured Doctor drags himself up a spiral staircase.)
DOCTOR: I think, in my current condition, it'll take me about a day and a half to reach the top of the tower. I think. If I'm lucky, I have a day and a half.
(The Doctor drags himself along a corridor, leaving smears of blood behind.)
DOCTOR: I have to do this, Clara. It's the only way. I have to be strong. I should have known from the very beginning. Of course. The portrait of you, the creature from my own nightmares. This place is my own bespoke torture chamber, intended for me only. And all those skulls in the water. How could there be other prisoners in my Hell? The answer, of course, is there never were any other prisoners. And the stars, they weren't in the wrong place, and I haven't time travelled.
(He collapses onto the floor of the Tardis as he actually reaches the teleport chamber room.)
DOCTOR:
I've just been here a very, very long time. Every room resets. Remember I told you that? Every room reverts to its original condition. Logically, the teleporter should do the same. Teleporter. Fancy word. Just like 3D printers, really, except they break down living matter and information, and transmit it. All you have to do is add energy. The room has reset, returned to its original condition when I arrived. That means there's a copy of me still in the hard drive. Me, exactly as I was, when I first got here, seven thousand years ago. All I have to find is some energy.
(He picks up the power cables and attaches them to his temples.)
DOCTOR:
And all you need for energy is something to burn.
(It is the dying Doctor who takes hold of the lever and pulls it down, sending power into the transporter console. When he finally falls to the ground, the cogs turn, the teleporter powers up, and he writes Bird in the dust with his last ounce of strength.
DOCTOR: How long can I keep doing this, Clara? Burning the old me, to make a new one?
(The Tardis goes dark. The burnt hand turns to dust. The bloodstains on the flagstones disappear. We are back to the start of the show.)

[Teleport chamber room]

(The Doctor gasps and coughs in the teleport chamber. The cogs stop turning and he gets out, closing the door behind him before scooping up dust and letting it run through his fingers.)
DOCTOR: If you think because she's dead, I am weak, then you understand very little. If you were any part of killing her and you're not afraid, then you understand nothing at all. So, for your own sake, understand this. I'm the Doctor. I'm coming to find you, and I will never, ever stop.

(After he leaves the room, the camera sweeps across the word Bird to the skull with power leads attached. Then the Doctor is throwing the stool through the window.)
DOCTOR [bedroom]: Because you won't see this coming!
(He dives into the sea and sees all the skulls. He exchanges his wet clothes for the dry set and excavates the grave again. He picks up Yorick and ends up on the top of the tower with the Veil behind him.)
DOCTOR: If I didn't know better, I'd say I've travelled seven thousand years into the future.
(Yorick falls into the sea, the Doctor opens the door to room 12 and punches a few more molecules off the Azbantium wall.)
DOCTOR: Aah! How many seconds in eternity?
(He crawls back to the teleport to do it all again.)
DOCTOR [tower]: If I didn't know better, I'd say I've travelled twelve thousand years into the future.
DOCTOR [room 12]: How many seconds in eternity? And the shepherd's boy Argh!
(And again.)
DOCTOR [tower]: Six hundred thousand years into the future.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Argh! How many seconds in eternity? And the shepherd's boy says Argh!
(Digging again, dropping the spoon in the soup.)
DOCTOR [tower]: Twelve hundred thousand years into the future.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Argh! And the shepherd's boy says Argh!
DOCTOR [tower]: Two million years into the future.
DOCTOR [room 12]: And the shepherd's boy says
(And again, and again, and again, getting dizzy with the flashing excerpts...)
DOCTOR [tower]: Twenty million years into the future.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Ow! And the shepherd's boy says, there's this mountain of pure diamond. It takes an hour to climb it, and an hour to go around it!
(Even faster flashes of scenes.)
DOCTOR [tower]: 52 million years.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Every hundred years, a little bird comes and sharpens its beak on the diamond mountain.
(Faster still.)
DOCTOR [tower]: Nearly a billion years.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Argh! And when the entire mountain is chiselled away, the first second of eternity will have passed!
(Faster still.)
DOCTOR [tower]: Well over a billion years.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Argh! You must think that's a hell of a long time,
(More and more.)
DOCTOR [tower]: Two billion years.
DOCTOR [room 12]: Personally, I think that's a hell of a
(Again.)

[Room 12]

(The Doctor charges the remaining layer of crystal at the end of the twenty foot tunnel.)
DOCTOR: Aaargh!
(The Azbantium finally gives way. Bright light floods in and the Veil explodes, cogwheels and shrouds falling to the floor.)
DOCTOR: Personally, I think that's a hell of a bird.

[Planet surface]

(The Doctor walks out of the portal created by the hole in the Azbantium onto a dry planet with a golden sky. The portal closes and a small round metal object falls to the ground. The Doctor picks up a miniature of the castle surrounded by blue water. Brass cogwheels fill the space and then an engraved cover closes over it. It is his confession dial. A small boy runs up to him.)
DOCTOR: Go to the city. Find somebody important. Tell them I'm back. Tell them, I know what they did, and I'm on my way. And if they ask you who I am, tell them I came the long way round.
(The boy runs off towards a tall metallic city with a towering Citadel at its heart. The Doctor speaks to his confession dial.)
DOCTOR: You can probably still hear me, so just between ourselves, you've got the prophecy wrong. The Hybrid is not half Dalek. Nothing is half Dalek. The Daleks would never allow that. The Hybrid destined to conquer Gallifrey and stand in its ruins
(The Doctor dons his sonic sunglasses.)
DOCTOR: Is me.


Yes, I did just post a full transcript for Heaven Sent. It seemed appropriate-a very special entry for a very special episode. I genuinely couldn't pick a favourite scene, because this is a masterpiece. An absolute f****** masterpiece, and the best piece of television ever made. Actually, screw that, the best thing ever made. This rises up over every definitive book, play, song, film, and is the best 55 minutes humanity has ever produced. Ever. I don't even know where to begin. This transcends Doctor Who, and is a genuine piece of art. Look at that cinematography. The writing is poetry. Peter Capaldi is our nation's finest actor. If I were forced to pick a standout, it would have to be that closing montage. It's superb. Simply exquisite. There are so many emotions there-joy, fear, upset, excitement, basically everything it's possibly for a human to feel. Just think about it. Four and a half billion years, of exactly the same thing. Exactly. This episode is so unusually bleak it makes it outstanding, because there's no happy ending. The Doctor sacrifices four and a half billion years of his life for nothing. Without hope, without witness, without reward. He gets nothing extra from keeping his secret, just his dignity, which isn't very much really. It's truly chilling. That moment when he reaches the wall and remembers what he's done and what he has to do, and knowing that he it is completely hopeless. He will die, and take a day and a half to reach the top of the castle, then do it all again. But think how he must have felt towards the end of it. Every time, when he gets towards the end of his story, he thinks that might be the time he could do it-but he doesn't. That is shattering. But another thing I love about it is that it's so layered and sophisticated. There are tons of clues early on-the skulls, the star patterns, which only come to fruition at the very end. This is definitely the show's cleverest episode, but it pulls it off without ever being pretentious, a very fine line to cross. This is the best piece of literature ever. Imagine it as a novelisation, or a Big Finish, or a comic. It works. It's a commentary on our mortality, the effect it has, and no matter what we can try to do, it's hopeless. Everybody close to us will die, and despite the Doctor's best efforts, Clara will never come back to him. This phenomenal episode is so brilliant. As well as being something different, it features the usual ingredients which make Who special. A terrifying monster, mysteries, excitement. The TARDIS scenes are some of the most thrilling the show has ever seen, and again full of little clues which fully pay off on a second watch. It's full of symbolism. The TARDIS is the Doctor's mind, Clara is his conscience (only seen from the back as that's how the Doctor last saw her), the skulls are death. It's full of great lines, with meaning. Nothing is throwaway, or dated. It's timeless. It still has fun-the Doctor running out of corridor, being nothing without an audience. The music is the Doctor. Slow and calm, meditated when it needs to be, fast paced and heroic in others. Everybody involved with this remarkable hour of TV is a genius, and deserves the highest honour the country can bestow on them. Rachel Talalay is the best director the show's ever had, likewise Murray Gold in the composer's job. This is undeniably Steven Moffat's finest script. Peter Capaldi's performance is the single best thing in Doctor Who. I'd like to give genuine thanks to everybody who made this amazing thing, which still affects me every day two years after it was first broadcast, and has encouraged me to do something more with my life. If I ever meet anybody involved with this, I hope they understand what this means to me, and thank you all for reading my ramblings. It might have taken a long time, but it's one hell of an episode.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 17 Dec 2017 - 20:44

Story 261-Hell Bent

"I think it's called...Clara."
The Scene: The Doctor plays a waitress a song.
Why it works: So here we are, at the end of Clara Oswald. It's a shame that after the episode which makes you think more deeply than any other episode of the show, we get one which is pretty much full of show related clichés, but that doesn't mean there aren't good things to find in it (I'm sure all the Clara haters will love that she left). I love Clara though, and she deserved a much better send off than this-but it's not all bad. The diner scenes are home to some lovely final interchanges between the pair, and serve as a nice framing device, delivering dramatic tension as we know they both make it out alive, but obviously something has changed because they don't recognise each other. Peter, as always, gives it his all in those heart breaking moments where he tries and fails to remember Clara, but he's equally great at the end when he puts his baggage behind him and moves on with his travels. And I suppose it is nice at least that Clara got a happy ending-although she's going to die, she can still have fun first, and in a classic TARDIS to boot. A reminder that even in the worst of episodes, there are always redeeming features.

Honourable Mentions-
"Lord President. With respect. Get off his planet."
A chilling scene which shows just how terrifying the Doctor can be when he's mad.

"Good luck."
An example in not how to write Doctor Who as the Doctor kills the General in a hugely out of character moment.

"We think four and a half billion years."
Clara finds out what the Doctor did for her in a long scene in the Cloisters which sees scares (the Daleks, Cybermen, Angels), touching moments (this) and ends in a heroic TARDIS theft.

"The hybrid. Five minutes to hell. I think it's time to tell the truth."
Ashildr confuses the hell out of the audience in a disappointing end to the season's weak arc.

"Tomorrow is promised to no one, Doctor, but I insist upon my past, I am entitled to that. It's mine."
The Doctor and Clara in a tense and touching scene which would have been the perfect end to their companionship, had they not had a billion goodbyes already.

Afterword-
I can't let Jenna Coleman go without commenting on the impact she's had on the show. In just over three years, she's saved the Doctor's life countless times, helped him through one of his trickiest regenerations, assisted him on so many adventures and encouraged him to become a better person. She's definitely one of the most influential companions we've ever had, and I'd just like to thank her for bringing life to this fab character.

Tomorrow-We finish off 2015 with Christmas special The Husbands of River Song, and cover 2016 with selected highlights from spin-off Class and Christmas episode The Return of Doctor Mysterio.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 18 Dec 2017 - 20:00

Story 262-The Husbands of River Song

"How long is a night on Darillium?"
The Scene: The Doctor and River have their last date.
Why it works: Steven Moffat's sure caused a lot of controversy in his run. Can he write, can he not? Is he funny, or dire? Whatever you think of him, the one thing he undeniably does brilliantly is plant clues. Just see Series 6, when Dorium tells the Doctor that when the question is answered, no living creature can fail to answer, and what do we see in The Time of the Doctor? A truth field. All of those genius clues in Heaven Sent. And now, River's story is brought full circle in a touching and fitting ending to her long companionship. The Sonic Screwdriver, the Singing Towers-heck, even the dialogue is almost exactly as described. The Doctor has a new haircut and suit, for example. Whereas references can sometimes be heaped on a little thick, they're used subtly and powerfully here to improve the sentiments, and the scene is all the better for it. More than in any other episode, you get the sense that the Doctor and River are in love, and the fact that he's willing to sacrifice twenty four years for her (although she might be jealous is she knew he gave up four and a half billion for Clara two episodes ago) speaks volumes about their relationship. Peter Capaldi and Alex Kingston are that rare breed of actor who can say Shakespeare with a look, and if this is the end for the character, then it's a perfectly fitting one which says goodbye to an interesting character brought to tremendous life by a remarkably well cast actor.

Honourable Mention-
"You don't expect a sunset to admire you back."
River's standout performance sees her sum up the Doctor not just to her, but to the universe in a touchingly well written speech.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 18 Dec 2017 - 20:22

2016-

Class-

For Tonight We Might Die
"Surely the aim should be not dying well?"
The Doctor appears to put a nice finishing touch to a promising opening episode to the spin-off cancelled before it reached its full potential.

The Coach with the Dragon Tattoo
"There is hunger! There is anger!"
Mr Armitage meets his demise in a shockingly violent scene which shows just how far this spin-off is prepared to go.

Nightvisiting-
"You don't get to have my closure!"
Tanya shows what she's made of in a tense denouement to a rather talkative episode.

Co-Owner of a Lonely Heart
"Are you not into it?"
One of the weirdest and most disgusting scenes in sci-fi as the Shadowkin have ice Warrior.

Brave-ish Heart
"Maybe not today, but trust me, you will."
Miss Quill gets a real chance to show off her anger inside her in a chilling scene.

Detained
"No! You confess!"
Charlie gets his hands on the rock in a brilliant closing scene to one of the show's most interesting stories.

The Metaphysical Engine, or What Quill Did
"Time passes differently here."
In an exciting episode which saw her get rid of the Arn, Quill faces a tough emotional struggle before leaving that alternate world and becoming a badass Queen of Evil. Albeit pregnant.

The Lost
"Why is everyone looking at me like that?"
In arguably the best episode of the show, April dies and becomes Corakinus, Tanya and Ram lose parents, and the Weeping Angels show up. Thrilling stuff.

Story 263-The Return of Doctor Mysterio
"But everything begins again too, and that's always happy."
The Scene: The Doctor and Nardole leave Lucy and Grant.
Why it works: Although it's hardly a classic, I love this episode. It's a perfectly pulpy superhero yarn great for a Christmas afternoon, but my only criticism with it would be its lack of festive cheer. I get that Moffat wanted to rest the Best Christmas Ever! idea after being used so many times, but he could have done more than just have a little tree on young Grant's beside table. But, although perhaps unintentional, this last scene is a fitting festive end to this episode. It's full of warmth, optimism and a summation of the Doctor, as the eternal dreamer. He's obviously still feeling the loss of River Song, but he realises he can do better things than mope (perhaps an epiphany reached by the events of Heaven Sent?) and reforms himself into the adventurer he once was, ready to explore and have new adventures. A perfect appetite wetter to the amazing adventures he has with Bill in the next year, and a cheerful note to end the only episode of the year on in a year filled with terrible, terrible events.

Honourable Mention-
"This is Mister Huffle. Mister Huffle feels pain."
It's no One Word Test, but an interestingly deep psychological tool used to get plot exposition out in a unique fashion.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 19 Dec 2017 - 20:08

Story 264-The Pilot

"Well, most people when they don't understand something, they frown. You smile."
The Scene: The Doctor and Bill meet.
Why it works: It will go down as one of the great tragedies in the history of Doctor Who that Bill only lasted one series. She's one of the best and most original companions she's ever had, and deserves more than thirteen episodes, three books and however many comic stories she ends up having (at least she's still alive in DWM and Titan), and this spellbinding introductory scene shows just why she's so great. She's inquisitive, fast, fun, aspirational, clever, intuitive-all the qualities a companion needs to have, which she has in spades. This is definitely one of the most arresting introductory scenes ever, and shows just what a talented companion we're going to have. And I can't talk about Bill without talking about the remarkable message of inclusivity she has. Here, we have that extremely rare TV character who can be gay without it being made a deal out of. The fact she likes girls isn't some plot arc she has to overcome, or stress over-it's just Bill, and her blasé attitude to what others think of her makes her utterly indestructible and a great adventuring character. One day, sexuality will literally be no deal, and although it might take until I'm old for this to happen, Bill is a small yet important step to making this a better country for all to live in.

Honourable Mentions-
"Time and Relative Dimension in Space. It means life."
An extremely cleverly directed piece perfect for introducing newcomers to the Doctor's world.

"I know you're not exactly a sci-fi person-"
Bill's perfect first reaction to the TARDIS heralds the start of a fun and fast paced chase through space.

"That's the Doctor for you. Never notices the tears."
Bill and Heather say goodbye in a satisfying denouement with a clever piece of foreshadowing for the season finale.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 19 Dec 2017 - 20:17

Story 265-Smile

"Mum is dead. And Hopeful, she's dead too. And her friend Sunshine, she's dead. And Eliza."
The Scene: An arresting cold open sees the plot set up intriguingly.
Why it works: I know I've picked the cold open as the stand out scene twice in a row now, but I think that, at this point, Who has mastered the intriguing set up. In a fairly standard episode with some questionable writing and acting, and a reset button for God's sake, these opening few minutes are some of the most exciting of the story. The core idea at the heart of the episode, of a twisted utopian society, is shown no more clearly than here, and the creepily unsettling performances make this quite an uncomfortable watch. Because they're actually killing people, the Emojibots are at their most scary here, and the impending sense of doom created makes this sequence quite gripping. If only the following could have sustained this quality.

Honourable Mention-
"Smiles aren't just smiles."
The Doctor and Bill fake grins to move past the Emojibots in another tense watch which echoes the success of the cold open.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 20 Dec 2017 - 19:28

Story 266-Thin Ice

"Human progress isn't measured by industry. It's measured by the value you place on a life."
The Scene: The Doctor rattles off another beautiful speech.
Why it works: Today's job has been made slightly easier, as after the Doctor finishes his soliloquy, Lord Sutcliffe does the helpful thing of analysing it for me! But don't worry, I'm not just going to copy the transcript, I'll be here to put my own spin on things whether you like it or not. What I love is that, by now, every writer on the show knows Capaldi loves a good speech, and can pull one off better than any Doctor before him (YES I WENT THERE!), and it's brilliant that they're using this to their advantage by giving him as many memorable moments as they can before he goes. But I also love that Sarah Dollard is slightly aware a magic speech fixing everything is becoming slightly clichéd by now in the series-the touch that Lord Sutcliffe knows what the Doctor was trying to do, and is unmoved by it (even making this a point with which to emotionally torture him) is a genius stroke, and only serves to make this despicable villain all the more hateable.

Honourable Mention-
"That's not what I asked!"
The other standout scene in the story sees a rare child death and Pearl Mackie giving one of her regularly remarkable performances as she confronts the Doctor about his past.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 20 Dec 2017 - 19:38

Story 267-Knock Knock

"John. My little boy. This has to end."
The Scene: Eliza and her son, the Landlord, are absorbed by the Dryads running amok in Bill's student house.
Why it works: As we approach the end of this blog, it seems appropriate I should dredge up a theme so commonly repeated in its early days it's become like a meme-emotion. Honestly, there are so many facets to creating a realistic character, but it you make their emotions real, then they become real. It's no coincidence that Mike Bartlett is one of this country's most talented writers, and that's because Doctor Foster is filled with realistic characters full of anger, hate, lies, manipulation, and I'm glad to see he's used his skills to give the large cast of this story realism. Without believable characters, this would have been an out and out horror fest, and not a very good one at that. But with the creepy, condescending character of the Landlord (of which some of the credit has to go to David Suchet), the caring, naïve Eliza, Bill's friends, who embody every archetype of student there is, as well as the sound plot with a deep mystery and impending threat, Bartlett's created a truly remarkable script that deserves to be a classic in an era where almost every story is one.

Honourable Mention-
"You like Little Mix?"
A reminder that every dark story needs some comedy, and the embarrassment just goes to further show that Bill is far from a two dimensional gay stereotype-she's one of the most rounded characters ever.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 21 Dec 2017 - 19:45

Story 268-Oxygen

"Bill. Bill! You're about to be exposed to the vacuum of space!"
The Scene: Bill is about to be exposed to the vacuum of space. And then she is.
Why it works: We all remember our favourite scary episodes. If you were young in the 60s, it was The Daleks (or The Mutants if you like, although that's wrong), 70s kids had The Green Death, the 80s had Colin Baker's coat, and millennials had Blink. But I'd love to be young now because watching this episode as a kid would have been literally the most terrifying thing ever. Whereas the other scariest episodes had their fears manifested as physical form via a monster, and therefore slightly removed from reality and calming, this episode is very, very real. It has adult scares too-the idea of money coming before people is very topical and frightening. Space isn't the friendly environment you see the guys from Star Wars floating about in-it's a real and very scary threat. This is shown no more clearly than here, in which the Doctor loses his sight trying to save Bill. As well as upping the scares, this adds a great dimension to this Doctor-at the start of his run, he was reluctant to even hold hands with Clara, who he's known for years, but now he's sacrificing himself for a girl he's known for a few months. It's appropriate he should meet the First Doctor in the Christmas special, as they've gone on similar journeys-starting off as almost the anti-hero, but transforming into delicate, warm and kind men.

Honourable Mentions-
"So, how does space kill you? I'm glad you asked."
An arresting, well directed start to a fascinating episode.

"He didn't tell me a joke."
A terrifying scene in which Bill joins the Space Zombies.

"I'm still blind!"
Although slightly melodramatic, a thrilling cliffhanger to an amazing story.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 21 Dec 2017 - 19:56

Story 269-Extremis

"Without hope. Without witness. Without reward. I am your friend."
The Scene: Missy is executed. And then she isn't.
Why it works: I'm actually cheating a bit today, because my standout moment is actually all the Missy scenes combined, which is a bit ironic, because these are the only bits of the story I didn't enjoy. Well, it's not that I didn't enjoy them, it's just that they didn't really have much relevance to the episode, and the way they were split up and dropped into the main narrative at random moments really got on my tits. But, in isolation, they're actually great scenes. It's a bold move to reveal the secret of the arc halfway through the season, but it shows guts on Steven Moffat's part, and surely indicates there are lots of storytelling options still to go if they can afford to throw away the big reveal so early on. The scenes also go very deep into characterisation, which you'll probably all be sick of hearing about by now. It starts the brilliant Series 10 mini arc of whether the Doctor and Missy can be friends, and Michelle Gomez gives a heart-breaking performance here as, for the first time, we genuinely believe the Master feels sorry. It's essentially fan service, but a good one, as it doesn't distract for the most part and fills in some of those niggling gaps fans were working a sweat up over, such as how come Nardole's travelling with the Doctor now, a plot summed up in great fashion with a neat tie up to River Song's story as well.

Honourable Mentions-
"Doctor-we have the Veritas."
A well directed sequence in which the Doctor regains eyesight and reads an online translation of the Veritas, and introduces the Monks, one of Who's best alien species in a while.

"Seven million and seven."
An extremely creepy scene in which Bill and Nardole finally get some time together, but it might be the last time they ever spend together...

"I'm calling the Doctor. Pressing send!"
The Doctor works out the neat plot twist of the story in a genuinely surprising fashion.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 22 Dec 2017 - 19:46

Story 270-The Pyramid at the End of the World

"Enjoy your sight, Doctor. Now see our world."
The Scene: Bill saves the Doctor, but at a cost.
Why it works: I don't often pick cliffhangers as highlighted scenes, but I felt I had to pick it today, as this is perhaps a quintessential Who cliffhanger. Rather than being a full blown end of the universe type affair, it cleverly and subtly strips back the idea of the end of the world starting in small and unexpected ways, and rather than the Doctor trying to save everything, all he has to do is save himself, the surprise timing of the cliffhanger and the rather smaller scale ending creating a sense of uniqueness. But it also gives Bill an extra time to shine in her all too brief stint on the series. Here, she plays the essential companion role of saving the Doctor, but this isn't a sign of a weak female character-she goes against orders to do so, and even though she may have made a wrong decision, she did it entirely unselfishly and she learns from her mistakes, and therefore wraps up the mini arc of the Doctor's blindness, surely one of the most innovative and bold in the recent history of the show.

Honourable Mention-
"The Pope, in your flat? Here?"
The previously is mixed with new footage in a bravely directed sequence.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 22 Dec 2017 - 19:57

Story 271-The Lie of the Land

"I fought against it, for you!"
The Scene: Bill shoots the Doctor.
Why it works: This is perhaps the entire history of Doctor Who summed up in one scene. So, so right in some parts and hideously wrong in others. Where it shines is the writing. The idea of the Doctor, our hero, the one we're actually supposed to like, siding with the enemy with no warning, is a terrifying thought, and one that's abandoned too briefly. The thought is explored greatly here, as he actually has some decent reasoning, and we see through those alien eyes just how bad we are as a species at times. But then, we have Bill, who makes equally valid points, and the outstanding acting from them both is exemplified here perhaps the best of the entire series. But then, it goes so, so wrong. Despite being headstrong, and feisty, and determined, Bill should never have used a gun on the Doctor. In their short travels together, she's learned to use her words as a weapon, and it's a shame that, after her mini speech earlier, this looked to be the way this stand off was going. Then, not only does the Doctor regenerate, but it's a fake regeneration. This joke like summoning of a supposedly mystical gift does nothing bar cheapen the effect of the real thing, and it's a shame that, this Christmas, I don't feel as much of a sense of death of this Doctor as I did with Tennant and Smith because he's had so many fake outs it doesn't seem like anything new any more.

Honourable Mentions-
"Your version of good is not absolute."
Missy becomes the stand out of the episode yet again even trapped in a glass cage as she begins to further soften and become a highlight of Capaldi's final few episodes.

"Bill's mum-you just went viral!"
A heart warming scene as Bill finally comes to terms with her missing Mum by using her feeling for her to overcome the Monks' invasion.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 23 Dec 2017 - 19:47

Story 272-Empress of Mars

"The execution took longer than expected, and I fear I have not used my time well."
The Scene: A tense closing to the episode featuring Godsacre and Iraxxa.
Why it works: It's quite funny that, in a story intended to be pure pulp, there are a lot of well characterised people in this marvellously fun story. People nowadays might expect a deep plot every week, but sometimes they forget that, in a show like Doctor Who which tells a story rather quickly every week, if a plot is thin this allows more time for characterisation-which is the case here. The human VS alien ownership battle has been done before, most obviously in practically all the Silurian stories, but this is one of the more successful examples as neither side is two dimensional. The Ice Warriors have both good and bad in them, as do the humans, and it shows co-operation between the races is possible, shown no more clearly than here when they finally begin to understand each other. But just because the plot is pulpy, it doesn't mean it isn't good-the idea of Victorians on Mars is so unique and brilliant, and the imagery of this episode is truly gorgeous. I have a feeling this will be an underrated classic in the future, which will be a real shame.

Honourable Mention-
"This is Alpha Centauri. Welcome to the universe!"
Every child of the 70s suffers a fangirl attack as Ysanne Churchman's voice ends the story on a high.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 23 Dec 2017 - 19:56

Story 273-The Eaters of Light

"I don't like men that way."
The Scene: A bonding moment as Bill finds out Lucius is bi.
Why it works: You can say what you like about PC and all that nonsense, but the fact is that Doctor Who is a popular show with a truly diverse range of fans, and it has a duty to its fandom to reflect their lives as they really are. Steven Moffat can say what he likes about the show not being exclusively for liberals, but he's forgotten that, in general, people who voted Brexit want their women in the kitchen, foreign people in other countries and gay people to keep themselves in the closet. I will not be apologetic in my love for this scene, basically a giant 'screw you' to any bigots watching in the audience, and a brilliant inspiration to youngsters everywhere that it's okay to be yourself. With the casting of the first female Doctor, making her appearance in two days' time, and her wonderfully diverse TARDIS crew on the way next year, it's brilliant to see that an old show like Doctor Who can still be modern and is in fact leading the way towards full equality in our society. It might just be a little British sci-fi show, but it's remarkable what power it has now and what it can do with that for the better.

Honourable Mention-
"I don't know. That's the trouble with hope. It's hard to resist."
Missy's cameo again becomes one of the best parts of the episode.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 24 Dec 2017 - 19:52

And here we are...the beginning of the end. I'll be posting a full review of the entire experiment and the Capaldi era in general shortly after Boxing Day, when I'll post the entry for Twice Upon a Time, but I'd like to thank you all for reading my nonsense over the last few months and enjoy these last couple of ramblings! As a special treat, and because there are so many genuinely great scenes for me to choose between, all of today's moments will be written as full length mini essays, rather than one scene explored in detail and some brief honourable mentions. Enjoy!

Story 274.1-World Enough and Time

"They won't come if she's dead."
The Scene: Bill gets shot. Sob.
Why it works: I know I said similar things in the entry for The Pilot, but it seems appropriate to say it again that it's one of the great injustices in the history of the show that Bill only stayed for one series. She was a genuinely ground breaking, unique character, smashing all the stereotypes that she could so easily have been written as. The look on her face here is full acting perfection from Pearl Mackie, and it's a testament to her that she made a whole part of the fandom feel like their hearts had been ripped out after just eleven episodes with her.

"No! No! Noooooo!"
The Scene: A literal cold open in which the Doctor regenerates. Or does he?
Why it works: Not much to say about this one, apart from it being another reminder that Doctor Who can still keep surprises, which is a great achievement in this internet age.

"Hello, I'm Doctor Who."
The Scene: Missy screws up the rules of the show in that way only she can.
Why it works: This is one of my last chances to praise Michelle Gomez, so here goes. This fun, outrageous flirty character is that rare thing of a likeable Moffat character, which is ironic as she's the only one we're meant to hate. She's a genuine bitch and she knows it, playing up this aspect of her character for full comic value. Despite what the naysayers may have said at first, this wasn't a gender swap for the sake of it-Gomez is one of our best Masters.

"She scares me. Like, she really scares me."
The Scene: That old New Who traditional scene where the Doctor and friend bond over chips.
Why it works: Moffat knew about the female Doctor, no matter how much bull he spouts. But it's a good thing he did, otherwise we'd never have had this wonderfully beautiful scene which serves, post shooting, as a poignant reminder of how good Bill's relationship with the Doctor was, and also helps to ease the viewer into the idea of a female Doctor, which admittedly might have felt a bit sudden without this necessary bit of foreshadowing.

"Pain. Pain. Pain. Pain."
The Scene: Bill discovers the horrors of the Cyber patients.
Why it works: I will admit-I had doubts about the Mondasian Cybermen coming back. They were naff throwaway creatures made for four episodes fifty years ago, made of cloth and bits of leftover plastic, and their voices were ridiculous. Not scary in the slightest. But then, our finest director, Rachel Talalay, came along and produced this genuinely creepy scene which finally realised the ambition those pioneering film makers in the 60s had. Amazing.

"I waited for you."
The Scene: A tense double cliffhanger in which the Master returns and Bill becomes a Cyberman.
Why it works: It's ironic that in a story where there are surprise left, right and centre, two of its biggest were spoiled in advance. John Simm's return was spoiled officially, whilst Bill's fate was practically confirmed in publicity pictures. A reminder that cliffhangers of this gravity are better kept secret, but it doesn't take away from the Earth shattering feeling these endings give the viewer. An exciting end to a great episode.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 24 Dec 2017 - 20:13

Story 274.-The Doctor Falls

"The Doctor's dead. He told me he's always hated you. Let's go."
The Scene: The Doctor escapes from the rooftop in spectacular style.
Why it works: This is a fast moving episode, no doubt about it. It has a hell of a lot to pack in an hour, practically being the end of an era whilst also having to make room for the actual plot, and what better way to do that than to get rid of it? It may have been criticised for the Genesis idea being disposed of, but with this out of the way, it becomes an out and out fangirl fest, and all the better for it. With this scene, any baggage of the last episode is disposed of and the story feels all the fresher for it.

"You are so strong. You're amazing."
The Scene: The Doctor visits the barn to tell Bill she is a Cyberman.
Why it works: I've said it before, I'll say it again-Rachel Talalay is a national treasure. The way she frames the conflicting nature of the real Bill and her Cyber form here is innovative and genuinely unique, and makes this episode all the more visually pleasing to watch. It's also helped by Pearl Mackie in the performance of her career-no fan can say they didn't feel the gut punch she did when she cries over the Doctor's dead body. Heart-breaking.

"No! No! When I say no, you turn back around! Hey! I'm going to be dead in a few hours, so before I go, let's have this out, you and me, once and for all. Winning? Is that what you think it's about? I'm not trying to win. I'm not doing this because I want to beat someone, or because I hate someone, or because, because I want to blame someone. It's not because it's fun and God knows it's not because it's easy. It's not even because it works, because it hardly ever does. I do what I do, because it's right! Because it's decent! And above all, it's kind. It's just that. Just kind. If I run away today, good people will die. If I stand and fight, some of them might live. Maybe not many, maybe not for long. Hey, you know, maybe there's no point in any of this at all, but it's the best I can do, so I'm going to do it. And I will stand here doing it till it kills me. You're going to die too, some day. How will that be? Have you thought about it? What would you die for? Who I am is where I stand. Where I stand, is where I fall. Stand with me. These people are terrified. Maybe we can help, a little. Why not, just at the end, just be kind?"
The Scene: Another classic Capaldi speech.
Why it works: Capaldi's era is littered with classic speeches. That is a fact. The Zygon Inversion, Listen, Flatline, Heaven Sent, Thin Ice, they're all there. But this is definitely one of the best of his era, on par with Heaven Sent and The Zygon Inversion as it truly explores what the Doctor is, who he is, and what he stands for. The Doctor doesn't want fame, or reward. All he wants is to help, and he knows it's a futile effort, but he does what he can for as long as he can. A truly emotional and apt summation of this fantastic character, brought to sensational life by the phenomenal Peter Dougan Capaldi. Goodbye, Doctor. I shall miss you.

"I'm going to name a town after you. A really rubbish one."
The Scene: Nardole says his goodbyes.
Why it works: If there's one thing I haven't talked much this season, it's Nardole. Matt Lucas brought some much needed comedy to a series which could easily have been depressingly dark, and he was an underrated and much valued part of this great year.

"I WILL NEVER STAND WITH THE DOCTOR!"
The Scene: A double regeneration as the Master and Missy kill each other.
Why it works: The double act of the Masters here may have been criticised for being either wasted or too smutty, but it can't be denied this is a perfect scene. Both actors give it their all and their finest performances as their respective characters, and the spot on laughing reaction of both as they lay dying is brilliant. But more than this, it's tragic. The Master would rather die than side with his enemy, whilst Missy has changed so much that this seems the obvious choice, but the Doctor will never know her bold choice. Remarkably written.

"Pity. No Stars. I'd hoped there'd be stars."
The Scene: The Doctor puts an end to the Cybermen.
Why it works: I've already gushed over Peter Capaldi today, but it's my last chance, so I'll do it again. These lines here never fail to get me crying. The way he says "I am the Doctor". The way he wishes for stars. This is a man who has literally just given his all to save a hell of a lot of people, and is desperate to see some beauty before he goes, because he doesn't want to live-as far as he's concerned, this is the end for him, and the universe doesn't even have the common decency to reward him for his work. Heart-breaking.

"Promise you won't go?"
The Scene: Heather returns to collect Bill.
Why it works: The advantage Who has now being more of an arc based series is that it can plant little things like this and give the long term viewer some sort of reward without taking away from any new viewers. The return of Heather, via her planting of tears, may have seemed throwaway at first, but it's a genius and suitable touch and feels like a reward for a viewer for putting almost 12 hours of their lives into a series.

"The original, you might say."
The Scene: The Doctor returns!
Why it works: I can't judge this properly yet-like everyone, I have to wait for tomorrow to see how David Bradley plays the part. But this was an ingenious and suitable decision, and will hopefully form a fitting end to Capaldi's stunning era. Thank you to everybody involved in these past few years, and for bringing us some of the best episode we have ever seen, and are likely to ever see.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 31 Dec 2017 - 20:44

And so here we are, you and me, on the last page...Sorry it's taken so long, but I was waiting for a transcript, and I thought it would be appropriate to review the episode on the last day of the year, so I really can say goodbye to Capaldi at the right time. So, without further ado, a very special and final entry...

Story 275-Twice Upon a Time

"Love, pride, hate, fear! Have you no emotions, sir?"
The Scene: Previously, on Doctor Who...709 episodes ago.
Why it works: I've sometimes criticised Steven Moffat for being too self indulgent, but this is perhaps the only time when it was okay for him to do so. It's his last script, it's Christmas, and, what's more, it works. The parallel play between the Doctors is needed for 12's character development in the story. And how fantastic is it that footage from The Tenth Planet, a discarded piece of television from fifty years ago, is broadcast to over five million people on Christmas Day, at primetime? Moffat might have made some bad decisions, but this is a genius one and a touching tribute to those hardcore fans who've stuck with the show under his run.

"He is the Doctor of war."
The Scene: Another nostalgia fest.
Why it works: Whilst most of the episode is a study of how 12 is disgusted by his former self, or some banter between the pair, or often both, it's nice to see the First Doctor isn't just there to be a sexist old cow. This scene fully explores how different the Doctor was at the start of his life, and David Bradley's great performance here fully conveys how horrified the Doctor is to discover the very different man he will become.

"I am not a good Dalek, you are a good Dalek!"
The Scene: Moffat ties up a loose end-it's a Christmas miracle!
Why it works: Not much to say about this one, just a comment that it's nice to see Capaldi's era come full circle here-who would have thought a one off Dalek could come back on Christmas Day three years later, without just being a piece of fan indulgence?

"Merry Christmas, Doctor."
The Scene: Clara comes back!
Why it works: Again, just a little comment, it's nice to see Jenna come back and bring this remarkable era full circle, despite her new found fame as Victoria. Although she could have kept her hair the same.

"Cuddle."
The Scene: Nardole comes back too.
Why it works: I'm saving my word count for the big finale-another nice tying up of the Capaldi era, and a fitting farewell to two of the best companions we've ever had in the show and who I shall miss terribly.

"Oh, brilliant!"
The Scene: Genuine TV history.
Why it works: The undoubted highlight of the story, which is definitely an iconic piece of TV. Some of the most innovative and pioneering minutes the show has ever seen as the Doctor changes gender for the first time. Rachel Talalay's direction conveys the sensitivity of the subject extraordinarily well, and the acting is utter perfection. Capaldi's farewell speech is fitting for him and he gives it his all in a delicate send off to both him and Moffat. But then Chibnall hits the ground running. I already feel secure with Whittaker as the Doctor, and with the intriguing new Earthbound arc, I'm very excited to see where this series goes next. This might have been a gamble, but it was a bold one, and one I'm very sure will pay off. Bring on September!

Afterword-
And that's it. Done. Well, until Series 11-I'll come back, and post a key moment for each episode shortly after broadcast. But until then, I'd just like to evaluate the remarkable eras I've covered on this blog, and pay tribute to some of the key players of the show in recent years. First of all, this entire experiment has reconfirmed how much I love Doctor Who. Writing about my favourite scenes has reminded me just how great this show is, and immediately makes me want to go back and watch all my DVDs until they break. I hope this phenomenon never ends.  But I'd like to thank you too, the readers. In October, when I posted a little musing about a Tennant episode, I never thought I'd blog every day until right now, and I never thought anybody would read it. So thank you for reading my nonsense, and I'm sorry if your favourite moments were never featured.

But before I go for the year, I'd like to pay tribute to those who've made the show so enjoyable over the past years, starting with Steven Moffat. He's had some highs, he's had some lows, but it's hard to deny he's genuinely changed the show. I can't say I'll miss him-he stayed too long and although he might have knocked out some more great stories, he probably would have done some bad ones too, and I think it's right for the show that he share it. But he did give us some truly iconic moments, so thank you.

An underrated part of Doctor Who is the direction, and in the Moffat era, the cinematography has really hit some new highs. I'd like to single out Nick Hurran and especially Rachel Talalay, two directors who brought innovative new sights to the Whoniverse, and who made special episodes all the more unique. Also, thanks to Murray Gold, who's continued to provide us with the best scores on TV at the moment.

But of course, it's the actors we see, and the actors most of us appreciate more than most. Matt Smith, Karen Gillan and Arthur Darvill's relationship is the best we've ever seen in the show, and has transferred onto screen flawlessly. Alex Kingston brought flirty life to River Song. We've had top name guest stars sparkle and fizz in even the tiniest of roles. John Hurt was the Doctor! David Tennant came back! Tom Baker! Wasn't the 50th special? Not forgetting Jenna Coleman, a great companion indeed, but let's not forget the unique pairing of Bill and Nardole, Pearl Mackie and Matt Lucas bringing fantastic acting to the Whoniverse. The casting of Michelle Gomez, and then playing her off with such polar opposites as Jemma Redgrave, Ingrid Oliver, John Simm, was superb. Genius.

But special thanks go to the Doctor. Peter Dougan Capaldi. Perhaps the most definitive Doctor in a while. Heaven Sent showed us the Doctor in a nutshell, and that's all due to this remarkable man's acting. He may have started off as a prickly old man, but four and a half billion years later, and he's turned into the kindest and wisest guardian of the universe the Doctor's ever been. That's one hell of a character. The public didn't agree, but Capaldi, you were one of the best Doctors ever, and I genuinely mean that, and it was a pleasure to watch your forty incredible adventures, and the best of luck to your future endeavours. Now, I eagerly await the exciting debut of Jodie Whittaker, and I hope the show goes from strength to strength. Doctor, I let you go.
avatar
Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

Posts : 2777
Join date : 2013-02-20
Age : 19
Location : At Home or the Library

Back to top Go down

Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum