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200 Golden Moments+

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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 27 Nov 2017 - 16:26

Story 239-The Name of the Doctor

"But not in the name of the Doctor."
The Scene: Doctor Who fans up and down the country fly into outrage as they find out there's a secret Doctor.
Why it works: What else could I pick for this episode apart from the most thrilling cliff-hanger in Doctor Who's history? This very special episode is packed with magical moments (some of which are honoured later), but this is undeniably the best scene in the episode, because, as I've said so many times before, it was unexpected. We all knew, although this was a one part story, there'd be some kind of cliff-hanger to lead into the big special, but I doubt anybody thought it would be as big as this. The point of the show is that, although we don't know who the Doctor is exactly, we trust him. He's still a mystery, but he's the protagonist, and the rules of film language tell us we're meant to root for them, meaning they're trustworthy as a rule of thumb. Sure, Rule 1 might be 'The Doctor Lies', but he's never lied for the hell of it, it's always been for a reason. And, as we approach the 45th minute of this episode and it looks like Clara's saved the day, the subtle arc of the Dark Doctor is wrapped up here as we, along with audience surrogate Clara, find out there's another Doctor-which just completely messes up the rules of the show, and leaves us genuinely wanting more before the special. What happened in the Time War? Why have we never heard of this guy before? Does this mean our merchandise is incorrectly labelled? It says something about the fans too, perhaps one of the best fandoms in the bunch, that copies of this episode were leaked on Blu-Ray two weeks before broadcast, and the majority of them were good enough not to spoil the surprise. And what a surprise! John Hurt! Him, the proper film actor, doing Doctor Who! As the Doctor! It speaks volumes that we got an actor of his calibre to take time out and give over so much time to one little British sci-fi show, and serves as a reminder in this important year just how significantly the world has changed because of one November night in 1963...

Tomorrow-It might be a couple of days late, but a bumper 50th Anniversary celebration entry consisting of the best moments from The Day of the Doctor, The Night of the Doctor, An Adventure in Space and Time, The Five-ish Doctors and Doctor Who Live: The Afterparty! Due around mid-day.

Honourable Mentions-
"Yes, what is it? What do you want?"
Clara makes her mark on the Doctor's life in a very big way in one of the boldest opening sequences ever seen in the show, which wraps up not only this season's arc, but perhaps the first 50 years of the Doctor's life-she makes him choose the TARDIS, saves him and Bessie from a Time Scoop, forces him to dangle from a cliff with only an umbrella to support him-a reminder that Doctor Who is never afraid to be bold and break its own rules.

"And it was Trenzalore? Definitely Trenzalore?"
A rare reminder of the fact the Doctor gets emotional, and a poignant way of showing just how human our alien hero is.

"Your name, Doctor. Answer me."
A tense scene which again reminds us that the Doctor is a much darker and mysterious person than we think he is.

"Run. Run, you clever boy. And remember me."
Clara follows the Great Intelligence into the Doctor's time stream in a fantastically epic scene which is an explosive finale to this constantly fitting season closer.

"Use the TARDIS, use something. Save her, but for God's sake be sensible!"
The Doctor and River make their last goodbyes (chronologically, at least) in a touching scene which can be read as the Doctor's last farewell, and another reminder that the Doctor puts love and companionship before anything else. Truly, there is no other hero on TV, in film or in literature like him.

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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 28 Nov 2017 - 17:20

The 50th Anniversary Celebrations-23rd November 2013...

Story 240-The Day of the Doctor

"Clara sometimes asks me if I dream. Of course I dream, I tell her. Everybody dreams."
The Scene: The episode ends on a high as the Eleventh Doctor joins his predecessors.
Why it works: Oh, how difficult today was. If I could, I would have chosen the entire script for a golden moment (although the honourable mentions will probably contain the rest of the script), but this is, for me, the highlight, and I know people will disagree with me, because the best thing about this multi layered episode is that there's something for everyone. There's Coal Hill for the older fans, UNIT for the Pertwee era, that magical Baker cameo, the glorious return of David Tennant for the newer fans, and even a little something new for those who like their extended universe. But this scene quite literally sums up the first 50 years of Doctor Who in a perfect, concise way. Not only do we get to see all thirteen Doctors, but the writing is word perfect too-an anniversary special can't just be about looking back, it has to look forward too, which is what this episode does so magically. Steven Moffat said in promo material for the episode that it starts Chapter 2 of the Doctor's life, and for once, that wasn't hyperbole-the Doctor has a genuine new purpose to his adventures now, and in a neat bit of symmetry, he's travelling the universe to find the thing that his escape from it made him want to start adventuring. And as we get that amazing soundtrack coming through, and the awesome credits kick in, every fan across the country must have felt quite privileged that this little British sci-fi show could pull off such a movie-sized feast for such a special occasion, and even more amazingly, everybody else across the world wanted to join in. There is much debate about when the golden age of Doctor Who was, but it's safe to say this was one of the most successful episodes of all time.

Honourable Mentions-
"Next time, would it kill you to knock?"
The TARDIS is taken directly to Trafalgar Square in one of Doctor Who's most visually impressive scenes ever which kick starts the episode in real style. It looked amazing in 3-D.

"Soldier, I'm going to need your gun."
John Hurt makes his mark in the Whoniverse in a memorable introduction scene which makes use of some of the best directing, editing and effects work the show has ever seen. They really are pulling out all the stops for this one.

"Stuck between a girl and a box. Story of your life, eh, Doctor?"
The Moment springs to life in a genius bit of writing which shows the right way to bring back a cast member without undermining their exit-if anything, this adds to it.

"It means we're going to need a new horse."
The Tenth Doctor is back on form and supplying the comedy which helps to alleviate some of the many dark moments in this episode.

"Anyone lose a fez?"
Classic Doctor banter as the three main incarnations meet up and royally take the piss out of each other.

"The Doctor will save me. The Doctor will save me."
Even Osgood gets some development in this packed story, again showing how fully rounded Who's guest cast are.

"It's the same screwdriver. Same software, different case."
A powerful character study into the Doctor's character as the very different incarnations learn how to work together.

"Any second now, you're going to stop that countdown. Both of you, together."
The Doctors wipe UNIT's memories to stop a bomb going off, a reminder that there is always a peaceful solution to everything.

"No, sir. All thirteen!"
In a genuinely legendary moment, every Doctor ever comes to the rescue to save Gallifrey and the show really does change forever.

"You know, I really think you might."
Every fan in the country gets chills as Matt Smith turns around to see the face behind an iconic voice-a well deserved cameo with a real purpose.

Other Amazing Celebrations-
An Adventure in Space and Time
The undoubted highlight of the anniversary year saw the well known story of Who's creation told in a brilliant new light, adding real depth to the people involved and making what was once a niche topic relatable to the masses. A moving insight into William Hartnell's life, and a much needed celebration of the work of Sydney Newman, the brilliant Verity Lambert and Waris Hussein.

The Night of the Doctor
Oh, this was something special. After 17 years, he's back-and it's about time. Paul McGann makes a welcome return in seven minutes in heaven for Doctor Who fans, as we get that long awaited regeneration and get to see more of a fabulous actor who was underserved by the hour he got in 1996.

The Five-ish Doctors Reboot
A hilarious half hour which makes fun of Doctor Who in a loving way, one of the hardest things to pull off, in a rip-roaring special filled with celebrity cameos and piss-taking all round. If only it had been released on DVD outside of that impossible to find box set.

Doctor Who Live: The Afterparty
We can laugh about it now, but this was undeniably the worst part of the celebrations, but it's so bad it's good. From failed video chats with One Direction, to a pointless gathering of companions, this abominable hour of television did at least provide some sense of celebration of the fantastic show we all know and love, and it gave us a rare chance to see the great Jackie Lane make a contribution to the programme.

Thank you all for reading today's mammoth entry! Tomorrow, we bid farewell to Matt Smith in The Time of the Doctor, with a brief extra appraisal of his entire era!


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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 29 Nov 2017 - 12:35

Story 241-The Time of the Doctor

"Everything you are, gone in a moment, like breath on a mirror."
The Scene: The Doctor trips and hallucinates over Amy for a bit before regenerating, whilst Clara looks on confused.
Why it works: Obviously, I had to pick the regeneration scene, didn't I? It's genuinely iconic, and whilst the episode itself may not be that strong plot wise, it's full of fantastic scenes (see Honourable Mentions for more) and this is definitely the best of those. Like The End of Time, my favourite regeneration story, it takes the time to explain to viewers through the inexperienced eyes of Clara what exactly regeneration is, that it's like death, and it does hurt, but the end result is for the better-what a fabulous message to send to the kids. But it's also beautifully written for the adults-without stooping to condescension, Moffat's monologue sums up the experience of life poignantly bordering on poetically, to create a very moving final scene for this Doctor. Furthermore, it does what The Day of the Doctor did best and looks not only forwards, but backwards. The little touches like Amelia and the Fish Custard create some sort of semblance of the Doctor's life flashing before his eyes, and the dropping of the bow tie really helps to say this is the end of the line. But then, Capaldi comes along and within a couple of lines, we know we're in safe hands.

Afterword-
Before we get to the Honourable Mentions, I just want to say a little something about this marvellous era we're leaving. I know I didn't do one for the Tennant era, but I kind of made my point in the actual entry for that one. It might have been a controversial couple of years, the move to series long stories for one being heavily criticised, but I just want to draw attention to the fact that this underrated era brought the Whoniverse a number of amazing things. The new series has lasted long enough by now, and been successful enough, to not be ashamed of its past and we've seen more classic references than ever before, in particular in the amazing 50th Anniversary story. We've had interesting new characters and genius new stories. We've had Bill Nighy and John Hurt doing guest appearances. And best of all, the show's finally made it big in the states. When you see the TARDIS image plastered over anything you can imagine, you've made it. It's a remarkable feat that, after eight years, the show's popularity has never wavered massively, and it's still cool to say you're proud to be a Whovian.

Honourable Mentions-
"You've got to be the Drunk Giraffe! You've got to commit! Don't be cool, guys! Cool is not cool!"
Matt Smith gives a final comedy performance as the funniest Doctor of the lot, and this adorable scene shows the Doctor as the grandfather we'd all love to have, stretching all the way back to the William Hartnell days- a neat bit of symmetry considering this is the final story of his first regeneration cycle.

"Thank you, Handles. And well done. Well done, mate."
The Doctor's longest serving companion bites the dust in a touching scene which helps the Doctor realise his time is nearly up.

"And now it's time for one last bow, like all your other selves. Eleven's hour is over now, the clock is striking Twelve."
Honestly, I'm getting teary just writing that. Clara reads the Doctor a poem from a rubbish classy cracker just before the hero goes off to face his death.

"You think you can stop me now, Daleks? If you want my life...come! And! Get! It!"
The Doctor is given a new regeneration cycle and uses the energy to destroy the Daleks in an epic denouement which gives Matt Smith the last chance to show himself as a hero.

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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 30 Nov 2017 - 15:36

Story 242-Deep Breath

"He sounds old. Please tell me I didn't get old, anything but old. I was young. Oh, is he grey?"
The Scene: Clara thinks about leaving the Doctor, but is stopped by a phone call from an old friend.
Why it works: Every Doctor has a scene where they become the part, and in this spectacular opening episode, Capaldi has quite a few, but, for me, this is the one where he secures the role. Although he's been heroic already and done all the regular stuff the Doctor does, he hasn't become friends with the companion yet-surely the most important thing to do, seeing as they're our audience surrogate and everything, and the fantastic thing about this scene is the unique way that it's done. Evidently, Capaldi's a very different Doctor to what we've had before, and a friendly chat wouldn't cut the mustard this time, and the idea of including the previous Doctor is brilliant-as well as providing closure to those too young to fully comprehend regeneration, it provides reassurance that it's okay to be scared, because the Doctor is too. And although we've seen him be both kind and cruel in the episode, we leave on a calming note that he's mostly kind and although he's not always going to show it, he still has good in him-proving once and for all that Capaldi is perhaps the definitive Doctor.

Honourable Mentions-
"The green one and the not green one. Or it could be the other way round, I mustn't prejudge."
The traditional post-regeneration scene opens the episode in hilarious fashion as the Doctor manages to thoroughly confuse the Paternoster Gang.

"Just because my pretty face has turned your head, do not assume that I am so easily distracted."
Clara proves what she's made of in a well edited scene which is perhaps the first indication of the more sophisticated direction Capaldi's era will have, including the phenomenal Rachel Talalay.

"Well, I don't like it either. Well, it's all right up until the eyebrows. Then it just goes haywire."
The Doctor confronts a scared hobo in another scene letting him show his comedy potential.

"Nothing is more important than my egomania!"
A curiously interesting long conversation between the Doctor and Clara in a restaurant proves itself to be an unexpected highlight.

"Go on, then. Do it. I'm not going to answer any of your questions, so you have to do it."
Clara proves herself as a companion yet again and, for the first time, perhaps shows she can be just as strong without the Doctor to bounce off.

"You realise, of course, one of us is lying about our basic programming."
The Doctor plays the hero for the first time in this incarnation as he probably pushes the Half-Face Man to his death.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 1 Dec 2017 - 16:03

Story 243-Into the Dalek

"Imagine the worst possible thing in the universe, then don't bother, because you're looking at it right now. This is evil refined as engineering."
The Scene: The Doctor, Clara and friends venture inside the Dalek...
Why it works: We may have got a fully rounded view into Capaldi's Doctor last week, but there's still work to be done-nobody can fully convince based on just their first episode, there's always a lot of other things the character can do, and this episode explores the darker side of this Doctor fantastically. It might have been easy to just jump into the adventures seeing as we had a longer first episode to get to know the Doctor better, but here, we see his nastier half in brilliant glory, which makes a nice contrast with the next episode, where his lighter side is allowed to dominate. But it was also a clever touch to have the Daleks in his second episode-what better way is there to contrast a darker force of good with a lighter force of evil? Both characters are, not for the first time but for the first time in a while, seeing life through each other's eyes, and in another fab piece of character development, they help each other see as they did before. But as well as bringing a new touch to the role, we also see Capaldi play the traditional Doctor-as we see him here genuinely amazed to be stepping into new territory, and explaining the threat of the Daleks in such a hating manner, it's hard not to feel secure with him in the role. However, just a few seconds later, when he fails to save a man from one of the antibodies, we're reminded that this is a new, unpredictable man, which makes the new series all the more exciting.

Honourable Mention-
"And isn't the universe beautiful?"
Clara inspires the Doctor to remind Rusty what he saw in the universe in a classic, fan-pleasing scene which epitomises the effect of the Daleks on the show, and the character of the Doctor especially, perhaps better than it has ever been expressed in the series before.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 2 Dec 2017 - 7:32

Story 244-Robot of Sherwood

"The Doctor and Robin Hood locked up in a cellar. Is this seriously the best that you can do?"
The Scene: To Clara's dismay, the Doctor and Robin Hood quibble endlessly in a dungeon.
Why it works: Just as the last episode showed Capaldi's darker side, this episode spins the character in completely the opposite direction and makes his comedy side come out more prominently than ever. This might be expected, seeing as this is one of the funniest episodes in a while, but, again, it also shows how multi-faceted this brilliant Doctor is. He's grumpy and stubborn, refusing to believe Robin Hood, he's heroic when he frees the slaves from the Knights, but, most obviously, he's the funny friend. There are tons of iconic comedy moments such as the spoon sword fight, the archery contest, and the banter displayed most prominently in this laugh out loud scene packed with genuinely rib tickling gags. Furthermore, it adds to 12's character development-he's learned by the end of this episode how to work with normal people and expand his mind, but Robin's last message reminds us that he's still dark and more untrustworthy than any Doctor since perhaps the seventh. The scene also expands Clara's role brilliantly-we get more insight into her otherwise vague past in this episode, and this sequence in particular reminds us that she's our eyes-we can see the irritating male banter as completely irrational and insane, and we completely understand when she's mistaken to be the leader, and therefore find comedy in the fact that this bemuses the Doctor and Robin. In a fun, pulpy tale, it's nice to know that character development and realism haven't been forgotten.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 3 Dec 2017 - 21:40

Story 245-Listen

"There is danger in this room, and guess what? It's you! Do you feel it? Do you think he feels it?"
The Scene: The Doctor tries to convince young Rupert Pink to turn his back on the creature.
Why it works: In just four episodes, Peter Capaldi has proved himself as the definitive Doctor-almost. The only thing he hasn't done yet is prove how he works with children, which is pulled off here with great success. In this marvellous scene, Capaldi shows the humanity of his Doctor perhaps the best way of his whole era, an essential quality to this story because, at its heart, it's all about children. It taps into that very primal fear that we don't exactly know what scares us, or why, and what better way to show this than to use children? They have no suspension of disbelief, and genuinely believe that there is a monster under the bed. But the best thing about this wonderful episode is, that like the other true classic of Capaldi's era (Heaven Sent), not everything is explained. The characters don't know what's under the bed, so why should we? It encourages thinking and creativity in an age of television so filled with worthless reality tat and mass produced entertainment. One of the best things is that it shows the Doctor himself as a child-when even our hero is none the wiser by the end and more scared than he's been in a while, it sends a great message to the kids that it's okay to be scared, and okay to ask questions. Some might say this isn't character development, but, in fact, it's the best kind. The Doctor might think he knows it all, but by the end of the episode, he knows not everything has an answer, and he's okay with this. Moffat might have gotten a lot of flack over his writing, but it's tough to deny this, along with Blink and the aforementioned masterpiece Heaven Sent, is one of his greatest accomplishments.

Honourable Mentions-

"Listen! Question. Why do we talk out loud when we know we're alone?"
The Doctor ponders one of the real mysteries of life in one of the most ambiguous and exciting cold opens seen in the show in recent years.

"I'm going to leave you something. Just so you'll always remember. Fear makes companions of us all."
Clara comforts the young Doctor in a truly iconic scene which adds in a lovely touch of nostalgia for the fans watching without it being too self indulgent, and cements Clara's own place as a worthwhile companion.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 4 Dec 2017 - 15:11

Story 246-Time Heist

"Keep your mind clear, Clara. Keep your mind blank."
The Scene: The Teller catches Clara, and the only thing she can do is remember what the Doctor told her.
Why it works: I've spoken a lot about character development and emotion and all that in this blog so much it's sort of become a bit of a meme, but one of the few topics I haven't touched on is the Monsters of Doctor Who (which sounds like an ideal title for some sort of cash-in book/magazine), and I'm bringing it up today because of the Teller. As much as I love the human characters in the show, it's a bit of a shame that delving deeper into their lives has arguably come at the cost of interesting monsters, or deep plots, but this episode rectifies both lacking factors in amazing style. The Teller is one of the best and most realistic monsters we've had in the show for many a year. He feels like a real character, not just a threat of the week-he doesn't want to be bank security, but he's doing it for that most human of emotions, love. Not to mention the general premise is very intriguing-how do you escape a monster who reads your mind and feeds off your guilt? Truly terrifying. The best part, perhaps, is his purpose in the plot. It's not a case of just using a random monster with a unique gimmick, it makes sense in the narrative that the supposedly most impregnable bank in the universe has such strong security-security as strong as the script, which is one of the most fun we've had in a while. Whilst not a classic, this is very good pulp, and, unlike other stories, has a romp without losing any of the integrity of more serious stories. The two Steves play around with time travel, interesting and disturbing ideas, fantastic characterisation and a few genuinely good twists, whilst even throwing in a couple of references which please the fans without detracting from the quality of the script, which is only further enhanced by the genius casting of the phenomenal Keeley Hawes, one of Britain's most talented actors and one of the few women who could have pulled off Karabraxos' determination and naivety with such realistic skill. It might not top any fan favourite lists, but this story is a gem, perfect for a relaxing watch whilst still standing up to critical scrutiny.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 5 Dec 2017 - 12:26

Story 247-The Caretaker

"Five stop intruder. Five stop intruder."
The Scene: A Policeman meets his demise investigating an empty building currently occupied by the Skovox Blitzer.
Why it works: Like yesterday's entry, this is a seemingly simple tale at first that shouldn't be taken at face value. Although it's essentially another fun romp, and an out and out comedy at times, there are some wonderful scenes littered throughout, featuring real characterisation of Clara and Danny's relationship, some wonderfully shot action sequences and the undeniable fun of the pre titles sequence. But perhaps the best is today's standout scene, where an innocent Policeman is killed by the Skovox Blitzer. Now, I may have spoken most of this blog highlighting the best of Moffat's era, but one of the worst things about it is that hardly anybody dies. Death makes the danger feel more real, and the scare levels go up. Part of the reason nobody's scared of a Dalek any more is because they haven't exterminated anybody in years! But in this unusually bleak scene, the fear of Doctor Who returns, as Moffat takes advantage of the later time slot and shows a horribly brutal death scene which proves the might of this week's threat, because it was needed more than ever. The Skovox Blitzer is referred to many times in the script as being one of the universe's most fearsome creatures, and we've had a lot of those by now, so it was really needed to show why this one deserves the title, especially seeing as its design could be laughable in the wrong light-which makes now a good time to also talk about the behind the scenes talent of the show. I don't talk about them much, but in the Capaldi era more than ever, the level of cinematography and lighting and sound effects have reached their peak, and, excitingly, are said to be even better for Series 11. It's a simple way of showing how much Doctor Who is appreciated now by using top notch equipment for every episode, and a far cry from the days of Myrka lumbering down brightly lit corridors. And the less said about that kick, the better.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 6 Dec 2017 - 12:04

Story 248-Kill the Moon

"It was cheap, it was pathetic. No, no, no, it was patronising."
The Scene: Clara and the Doctor have an intense row after he leaves her to make a decision by herself.
Why it works: I'm going to say it-I love Kill the Moon. Yes, I know, the science makes absolutely no sense at all, and the plot isn't much either, but the talent behind it is phenomenal. The effects are great, the cinematography is absolutely astounding, the music is on top form, but the best thing about it is the acting. Obviously, we've got Hermione Norris in for a week, so that's good enough, but then we get this amazing scene in which our regulars give it their all. This is undoubtedly the highlight of Jenna Coleman's time on the show. For all those people who said at first she had no character, this scene shows a more fully rounded woman than we took for granted at first. The writing is spot on, and her performance helps us to genuinely believe Clara is pissed off here, and rightly so. For all the nonsense of the plot, the moral dilemma at the heart of it is fascinating, and can be put into a real life perspective now with Brexit looming. This underrated episode shows Clara as headstrong, fearless and intuitive-essentially the perfect companion. And I can't go without mentioning Peter Capaldi's performance here. He's still one of the best Doctors ever even when he's mostly silent. Just look at his face. He looks so genuinely betrayed and upset, and the subtleties in his voice and movements convey the Doctor perfectly. Peter Capaldi is the Doctor for nineteen more days, and that's a great shame. Treasure this remarkable actor whilst you can, and appreciate the outstanding contribution he's made to the show.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 7 Dec 2017 - 7:28

Story 249-Mummy on the Orient Express

"I'm the Doctor and I will be your victim this evening. Are you my mummy?"
The Scene: The Doctor adopts Maisie's personality to attract the Foretold.
Why it works: Oh, this is a great episode. Like previous episodes this series, it's a pulpy romp, but, unlike many others, it isn't flimsy. The plot is so well rounded, there's a reason for everything and the characters are fascinating. It's an actual pleasure to watch it, so much so that I don't think there are any scenes which stand above the rest-they're all great. But I chose this one because it showcases everything that's great about the episode in a few minutes. The monster this week is utterly amazing. The Foretold is a rare monster with actually deep motivations, and he scares so well on TV alone, so God knows what it must be like at live shows like the Symphonic Spectacular. The script has so many well written lines and well placed, witty quips (did anybody not laugh at the Doctor's line above?) and it pushes the boundaries of what's acceptable for Doctor Who-would any other story have so many deaths, including a number in space? Jamie Mathieson proves in a spectacular debut the talent he has for story and creating real life characters, people exquisitely brought to life by actors who get the 1920s and are able to put some of that authenticity into the performance, including the remarkable Frank Skinner, who blends his straight and comedy acting talents into one of the best non companions we've ever had. And I can't go without mentioning the regulars again. We get more development, of the Doctor as a dark character and Clara being sympathetic, with top form performances from Jenna Coleman showing a more sensitive side to her character and Peter Capaldi showing the multi-faceted Doctor he's so great at playing. With one of his era's best writers having made his debut, the Capaldi era is well and truly underway, and it's good.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 8 Dec 2017 - 7:43

Story 250-Flatline

"You are monsters. That is the role you seem determined to play. So it seems I must play mine. The man that stops the monsters."
The Scene: The Doctor's back to full size, and gives the Boneless hell.
Why it works: Has there ever been a writer in Who's history with as strong a debut as Jamie Mathieson? If you thought Mummy on the Orient Express was good, this just blows it out of the park. It's quintessential Who, but it isn't clichéd in the slightest-literally everything is original and unique. Every scene is important and exciting, and that makes the episode a genuinely immersive watch. But this scene is today's highlight because it shows one of the strangest things about the episode-with the Doctor's presence being extremely strong in an episode he's hardly in. The Doctor's persona is explored without it dominating the plot-by making Clara the protagonist, we get to see how the Doctor is from the perspective of an outsider, and so does the Doctor. The false hope, the lies, the mistakes show the Doctor as a flawed person, but this amazing denouement shows him as the most important thing-the hero. Even when he's in a mini TARDIS, he's still the cleverest person in the room (so much so he can change his hair willy-nilly!). Before I go, I have to mention the brilliant guest acting in this episode (although maybe Rigsy doesn't count as he's been in two stories). Every little character is utterly believable, and it's hard not to feel something when Bill is relieved to be alive, or when the worst people survive. This amazing episode features scares, comedy, clever twists, fantastic acting, great special effects and completely original monsters-in other words, the best kind of show.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 9 Dec 2017 - 7:22

Story 251-In The Forest of the Night

"There are very good solid scientific reasons for being really quite frightened now."
The Scene: Some wolves appear and then bugger off.
Why it works: I'm sorry, but I can't. I know the point of this blog was to highlight the outstanding moment in every episode, but I really don't have anything nice to say about this awful mess. I truly despise this episode more than any other, and the only reason I chose this scene was because, for a few seconds, it has a sense of threat. There is literally no plot to this s***. Some trees pop up, protect us from a fireball, disappear, the end. There's nothing for the characters to do apart from wait for things to clear up, maybe stop a few guys from chopping them down. Not even Capaldi can be bothered with this script, and it's genuinely painful to spend 45 minutes with these kids. The title music is so out of sync it hurts, and the set design is sparse. And what the f*** is that ending?! I really can't go on any more. Sorry today's entry is so short, but I hate to be negative, and anything else I've got to say is just more of the same. Let's truly hope we never get an episode like this again.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 10 Dec 2017 - 20:19

For the first time since The Rebel Flesh/The Almost People in 2011, we have a two parter, which means a double entry today! Enjoy!

Story 252.1-Dark Water

"Well, I couldn't very well keep calling myself the Master, now could I?"
The Scene: Jaws drop around the country as we learn the truth about Missy.
Why it works: Well, it's an obvious choice, isn't it? A genuinely legendary scene in Doctor Who history, as that long time antagonist the Master becomes a woman. I feel sorry for fans who've joined us in the last few years, because they'll never know how this felt at the time. The Master! Is a woman! It felt like the most scandalous and biggest change ever in Doctor Who. Well, apart from when William Hartnell became Patrick Troughton, or when the Cybermen came back, or when John Hurt was not the Doctor. My point is, the show thrives on change. If nothing had ever changed, it would have been dead after three years. But then again, change isn't always a good thing-the schedules of BBC One after 6th December 1989 wasn't a good one. Fortunately, Missy was a brilliant change. By turning the villain on their head in such a drastic fashion, we got to see a whole new side to her. The evil schemes of her past selves were there, the self-conscious campiness, but we also got to see her emotional side for the first time. Who would have thought back in 1971 that a wicked, bearded man could turn into such a deep character with a real friendship with the Doctor? Who could have thought that the person who was once Anthony Ainley could make an audience cry with a heart breaking death scene? Who would have thought a character who was once Derek Jacobi could kill an audience favourite character and make it a funny scene? Not all changes are good, but this one was, and I think we're all praying the big change on Christmas Day will be as successful as this one was.

Honourable Mentions-
"Can you please just put me back on the phone to Danny?"
Danny Pink is killed in one of the most shocking cold opens seen in a while, which gives the phenomenal Rachel Talalay her first chance to show off her directing talent.

"Do you think I care for you so little that betraying me would make a difference?"
Clara destroys all seven TARDIS keys in a tense scene which showcases the talent of our two regulars.

"Don't cremate me. Don't cremate me."
A horrific scene which pushes the boundaries of what Doctor Who can do in tremendous fashion. Mary Whitehouse would have had a field day with this one.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 10 Dec 2017 - 20:33

Story 252.2-Death in Heaven

"Ahem. I'm going to kill you in a minute. I'm not even kidding."
The Scene: Missy kills Osgood. *cries*
Why it works: Missy really is so fine. I know I spent the last entry talking about her, but she's so fine she not only blows my mind, but I'm going to ramble about her again, so there. This is the scene where I fell in love with Missy, which I never expected to say, because I love Osgood too. Really though, I suppose it makes sense, because they're probably the best performances from these remarkable women, because they show them as real, fully rounded characters, and not the clichéd stereotypes they could have easily been. Osgood gets some backbone. She isn't a clever clogs with problems, she stands up to somebody she knows could, and does, kill her, with some seriously impressive gusto and believability. And then that bitch goes and kills her. At the start of the scene, Missy is playing it for comedy, tied up and taking the piss out of pop songs. And by the end, she's the most wicked, despised character in the Whoniverse-aka the perfect Master. She's cruel, and she knows it. She knows how to annoy the heck out of the regulars. She's completely mad yet composed. Doctor Who has a new Queen. Say something nice.

Honourable Mentions-
"I'm the Doctor."
Clara gives the finger to the haters in a gloriously different scene which plays around with the titles in a really fun way.

"Oh! Permission to squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!"
The Doctor free-falls into the TARDIS in one of the show's most exciting scenes, and that classic of the Rachel Talalay episode, the Doctor falling (here, Heaven Sent, The Doctor Falls (well, at least metaphorically))

"This is not the order of a general, nor the whim of a lunatic."
Danny sacrifices himself in a scene which uses its longevity to its dramatic advantage, which also sees a happy ending as Kate is saved and the Brigadier is waved off.

"Never trust a hug. It's just a way to hide your face."
The Doctor says goodbye to Clara, and not for the last time, in a lovely scene with just a nice touch of darkness to end the episode-or so it would seem, Santa cameo not withstanding.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 11 Dec 2017 - 17:15

Story 253-Last Christmas

"This is your mind trying to tell you this isn't real."
The Scene: The Doctor realises why Santa is there-because nothing around them is real...
Why it works: This is a bit of a marmite episode-lots of people find it engaging and innovative, whilst an equal amount find it dull and repetitive. Sorry if you disagree, but I belong to the first group. Not only is this one of my favourite Christmas specials, it might be one of my favourite Capaldi episodes, because it takes the tropes associated with the Christmas Who story and uses them in the familiar way whilst also serving up a darn good tale which could be watched at any time of the year-the festive spirit only helps when it's near Christmas. I can't tell you how much I love this underrate gem. The plot is so intricate. Rather than Santa being there to shove the festive spirit down your throat, it's to help the Doctor and co realise they're still dreaming. How terrifying is the thought that, when you think you're okay, there's an ugly face thing eating your life essence? The design is superb-every detail of the monsters and the sets are so believable. The characters are so layered and deep every one of them is companion worthy. It makes references without being pretentious. The plot is so intricate there are tons of little touches which make everything click upon a rewatch. The writing and cinematography make it a pleasure to enjoy. There is tons I could say about this, and I wouldn't even know how to begin, so I'll end it by saying again that this is one of the best, and most underrated, Christmas episodes of the bunch, packed with memorable scenes and feel good moments, without losing any of Who's traditional scares.

Honourable Mentions-

"Oh, that noise. Never realised how much I loved it."
The Doctor and Clara are reunited in a literal cold open which sets the fast pace for this fun story.

"Here comes your earworm."
Shona defeats the monsters by dancing to Slade. One of Who's funniest, and most unique, scenes.

"I've always believed in Santa Claus. But he looks a little different to me."
The Doctor and Clara ride with Santa in a heart warming scene where only the most miserable miser would fail to feel festive.

"We should do this every Christmas."
Every 11/Clara shipper in the country cries as the Doctor helps old Clara to pull a cracker.

Note-Just a warning, from tomorrow, two episode will be covered every day-this is because I want to get to The Doctor Falls by Christmas Eve so I can write about Twice Upon a Time after broadcast, but it also makes sense seeing as Series 9 is mostly two parters anyway, and nearly half of the Series 10 episodes are part of multi episode stories, so it's not like I'm breaking the one story a day rule that much. In addition, The Husbands of River Song/The Return of Doctor Mysterio day, 18th December, will see a mini entry on Class, with a brief appraisal of each of its eight episodes sandwiched between the specials. Hope you're all enjoying the blog anyway, and see you here tomorrow for The Magician's Apprentice and The Witch's Familiar!
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek Yesterday at 12:41

Story 254.1-The Magician's Apprentice

"Davros. My name is Davros."
The Scene: The Doctor tries to save a young boy from the Hand Mines.
Why it works: Another obvious choice for the standout scene, simply because, at just two years old, it's already become iconic. In one of the most exciting cold opens in recent years, we're reminded of the power Doctor Who has to shock because, although this was guessed right by some of the tabloids, it was unexpected, and that instantly made the whole episode all the more gripping. Although this is far too fan pleasing for a season opener (I suspect many would have turned off after those brilliant titles), it is good at times to have little indulgences like this. They add to the show's already rich mythology without taking away from it, and, at times (here included), foreknowledge makes the scene all the more engrossing-we know the Doctor has a moral dilemma here, and the viewer is instantly waiting for the end of the story to see what he does about it. This might not be one of the strongest season openers, but for a fan of the Doctor and Davros, it's certainly one of the most interesting.

Honourable Mentions-
"One of those was a lie. Can you guess which one?"
Missy makes a remarkable return to form in a scene with her fun, flirty personality written all over it.

"Hugging is a great way to hide your face."
The Doctor and Clara reunite in a long scene which never outstays its welcome, being equally packed with comedy, drama and heartfelt moments.

"Is this not life at its purest?"
Davros gleefully taunts the Doctor as both Missy and Clara are bumped off, leading into one of the best recent cliffhangers.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek Yesterday at 12:52

Story 254.2-The Witch's Familiar

"Yes, I know that you're a Dalek! Where is Clara Oswald?"
The Scene: The Doctor nearly exterminates Clara-Dalek.
Why it works: One thing I've noted reviewing these episodes for this blog is that, especially in the Capaldi era, Who can take a long scene and use its length for dramatics as far as it can, which is showed perfectly here. Take the restaurant scene in Deep Breath, or Death in Heaven's graveyard stand off. Those scenes must be some of the longest in the show's history, but also some of the tension. You can hear the breathing (or not) in the room as the Doctor realises all the diners are Clockwork Robots, or feel Clara's anger as Danny sacrifices himself. And now, this brilliant scene ramps up the tension as the Doctor nearly kills his companion. It's such a brutal thought, but it nearly happens, not only giving the show another chance to show off its fantastic leads, but giving Missy a chance to show her evil side, seeing as she's spent most of the story in frenemy mode. But it also serves a purpose to the plot-this makes the Doctor realise that the Daleks maybe do have some sort of better half, tying into the cliffhanger resolution right at the end of the episode in one of the programme's most timey-wimey twists. An unexpected and gripping highlight of an action packed episode.

Honourable Mentions-
"Because he always assumes he's going to win."
Missy explains to Clara how they survived in one of the most thrilling title sequences ever, which includes a pre-Heaven Sent reference to that masterpiece to boot.

"Admit it. You've all had this exact nightmare."
The Doctor rocks up in Davros' chair in a glorious screwing of the rules of the show.

"You can't kill a Dalek with a brooch!"
Missy kills a Dalek. With a brooch. Proving Clara wrong. It takes the piss, but it's fab, and another reason I love Missy.

"Look, the sun's coming up. We're on the same side now."
Moffat does that impossible thing of making us care for Davros, as he again rips up the rules in a scene where Davros opens his eyes.
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