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200 Golden Moments+

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200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 20 Oct 2017 - 18:38

Some of you may remember to celebrate Planet of the Dead as the 200th story in 2009, Doctor Who Magazine produced the 200 Golden Moments bookazine, which highlighted a standout scene from each story introduced with a quote, a summary of the scene and a reason why it's so great. Seeing as how we're coming up to a very momentous episode this Christmas, I thought I'd do a continuation of this, covering The Waters of Mars up to this Christmas' episode, in the same format as the bookazine. In one change, I'll be selecting one scene per episode, but when it's part of a multi part story, both episodes' scenes will be posted on the same day-I'll have to double up if I want to get to Twice Upon a Time straight after broadcast. There will be some exceptions-legendary episodes such as The Day of the Doctor, Heaven Sent, The Doctor Falls, etc. will have multiple scenes because they can't be defined by one. So without further ado, let's continue with entry 201, The Waters of Mars!

Story 201-The Waters of Mars
"Imagine you were in Pompeii."
The Scene: The Doctor, knowing the fate of the crew of Bowie Base One, cruelly leaves them to face their deaths at the watery hands of the Flood, but Captain Adelaide Brooke traps him in the airlock until he confesses what he knows.
Why it works: This is a superb episode, and there are lots of fab scenes in it-it might surprise some that I didn't chose the scene where Adelaide commits suicide, but this, personally, supersedes it because it's so out of character for the Doctor, especially Tennant-easily the happiest of the lot. But here, he's cruel, even bordering on evil, disregarding the human traits he's accumulated over his many years. It's such a drastic turn, you feel the frustration from Adelaide and her colleagues as he refuses to help, and completely helps the viewer to sympathise with a one shot character, which is a hard thing to achieve. Even though the Doctor's acted so irresponsibly, you even feel for him at the end when he realises he's made a huge mistake and this downfall in his character arc leads very nicely into The End of Time. Doctor Who is very good, always, but it isn't always this sophisticated.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Admin-Emperor Dalek on Sat 21 Oct 2017 - 14:35

It was a good story.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 21 Oct 2017 - 19:25

The series continues today with a golden moment for each episode of David Tennant's swansong, The End of Time! I should have said yesterday as well, I'm fine if anybody else wants to contribute an alternate scene for any of the episodes, it'll be more fun if it's more interactive.

Story 202.1-The End of Time (Part One)
"Even then, even if I change, it feels like dying."
The Scene: Shortly after being discovered by the Silver Cloak, the Doctor catches up with Wilf in a café and explains to his companion what regeneration feels like.
Why it works: Part of the reason I despise Time and the Rani is because it treats regeneration like it's nothing. The Doctor bumps his head and changes, a huge event in his life just happens without a word said by anyone. Part of the reason I love The End of Time is because it treats regeneration like it's a big deal, which is exactly how it should be. People always crictise Tennant's Doctor for being too emotional, but what's wrong with that? Doctor Who, despite being sci-fi, is grounded in reality-it only works if the people feel real and, believe it or not, people have emotions. For the first time since The Caves of Androzani, I properly felt here that regeneration isn't just change, it's death. Properly think about dying-it hurts, doesn't it? Much worse than bumping your head on a table, at least.

Honourable Mention-
"For The End of Time itself!"
It's revealed that Gallifrey is back, and it's a perfect example of how, even in this age of internet spoilers, Doctor Who can still knock the socks off the viewer with a good old surprise.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 21 Oct 2017 - 19:33

Story 202.2-The End of Time (Part Two)

"I don't want to go!"
The Scene: The Tenth Doctor departs in a literal blaze of fire.
Why it works: What else could I pick for this episode? This moment truly marks the end of an era, and I'm not afraid to say it still makes me choke up every time I watch it. I think people forget, or underestimate, or don't even think about what Russell T Davies did for Doctor Who, but it truly is remarkable. The show might have been kept alive in the 90s by the fans, but to the public, it was dead and worse than being dead, it was unloved. Davies took this corpse and transformed it into the best, most beautiful, successful, terrifying, thrilling ride of an adventure series and the most amazing thing was, it worked. Everybody loved Doctor Who. Children loved it, teenagers loved it, adults loved it. From 26th March 2005-1st January 2010, Doctor Who truly had a golden age. That's not to say it never had other golden ages, or that the other eras aren't as good, but I don't think people understand when they complain about the new series that without it, there would probably have been nothing by now. But Doctor Who is still a juggernaut of television, and for that, I give thanks to the great Russell T.

Honourable Mentions-
"Worst. Rescue. Ever!"
The Doctor is pushed down the stairs whilst strapped upright to a chair in this genuinely funny scene which proves that, even in the darkest of stories, a laugh doesn't hurt.

"I could do so much more. So much more!"
The Doctor rages against the trapped Wilf in this tense piece letting David Tennant and Bernard Cribbins give almost flawless performances before they leave.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 22 Oct 2017 - 21:02

Story 203-The Eleventh Hour

"Could I have an apple?"
The Scene: The Eleventh Doctor makes his first appearance by popping out of the TARDIS and surprising the young Amelia Pond.
Why it works: Just like in my last entry, when I said I don't think people appreciate just how well a job Russell T Davies did in resurrecting a practically dead show, in this entry I'll explain why I don't think people appreciate how well a job Steven Moffat did in keeping it alive. Bear in mind, the BBC considered cancelling the show after Series 4 because they thought David Tennant was irreplaceable, and it didn't help that everybody thought Matt Smith was an inexperienced buffoon. With this line, both Smith and Moffat stuck a giant finger up to the doubters and haters, and proved that Doctor Who still had life in it. Whatever you think of Moffat's era, you can't deny it's a huge accomplishment to carry a giant show for six seasons, each containing a minimum of 12 episodes, each with a different setting and cast and...well, everything. That is quite amazing. Just as the last entry mourned the end of an era, this entry celebrates the start of a new one.

Honourable Mentions-

"Look at it. Fresh as the day you gave it to me."
The Doctor gets Amy to trust him by showing her a twelve year old fresh apple in a tender scene which showcases the brilliantly sophisticated cinematography introduced in the Smith era.

"Hello. I'm the Doctor. Basically, run."
The Doctor terrifies the Atraxi in a truly iconic scene which proves that the new era of Doctor Who is well underway.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 23 Oct 2017 - 11:51

Story 204-The Beast Below

"Hold tight. We're bringing down the government."
The Scene: Amy is shown the future history of her species and, traumatised by the film, chooses to forget what she's seen. When the Doctor finds out, he decides to protest...
Why it works: This isn't my favourite episode (even Steven Moffat said it was amongst the worst things he's ever written), but the core idea at the heart of this episode, and displayed prominently in this scene, is very fascinating. An isolated UK with an untrustworthy government behind it may draw uncomfortable similarities with the world we live in today, but it gives Matt Smith another chance to prove he is the Doctor, by showing the character stripped down to his core set of morals, and it also gives Amy a chance to properly shine as the companion. Again, I feel like I should remind you that, at the time, Matt Smith was a really hard sell as the Doctor, and Moffat must have worked his socks off thinking of ways to try and convince viewers of this. So what did he do? He wrote the opposite of a good Doctor-genocide is not in his nature, but at the same time, it's perhaps a perfect portrayal of the character. The Doctor knows this isn't the right choice, but it's the best option, so he does it anyway. Not only this, he protests-the Doctor is primarily a rebel, fighting for the good even if the only way he can do this is by being bad. As mentioned earlier, Amy gets her first real chance to show how important the role of the companion is too-she acts as the Doctor's moral compass, forcing him to realise there is another way and not only is she clever and sensible, but emotional-her mini monologue at the end of the episode shows she understands her new friend, and already a strong bond has formed between them. The episode might not be perfect, but there are some very golden moments in it.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 24 Oct 2017 - 17:20

Story 205-Victory of the Daleks

"You are my enemy!"
The Scene: The Doctor's finally had enough of nice Daleks and lays into one of the Ironsides. This doesn't pay off well.
Why it works: It seems all I've done in this blog over the past few days is praise Matt Smith, and I'm sorry, but that's what I'll be doing again today. I'm sure I don't need to remind regular readers that Matt Smith was a tough sell at the time, but with this episode, he displayed the last trait of the Doctor he needed to win over any doubters-anger. He'd shown his comedy side and his winning side in The Eleventh Hour, his emotional side and his moralistic side in The Beast Below, and now he gives it his all hitting a Dalek with a spanner. In an episode unfortunately best known now for its rainbow Daleks, people tend to forget that, amongst the Matt Smith greatest moments filled with Pandorica and Akhaten speeches, there's this little gem showing just how furious this most childlike of incarnations can get at times.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Admin-Emperor Dalek on Tue 24 Oct 2017 - 17:51

With the Ironside in the story they were good, but overall the story was poor.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 25 Oct 2017 - 11:42

I agree, it was working until they introduced the Paradigm, and then it sort of flopped. Anyway, we've got a two parter today, so a double entry to the blog!

Story 206.1-The Time of Angels

"Didn't anyone ever tell you there's one thing you never put in a trap?"
The Scene: With the Weeping Angels closing in, the Doctor takes up a gun whilst threatening Angel Bob.
Why it works: I'm not going to go on praising Smith today, don't worry (although it is worth mentioning this is the first of his 'iconic' speeches), but this is a hilarious example of when Doctor Who goes wrong. Anybody who didn't watch this on the first transmission will probably have no idea what I'm rambling about, but this scene has become famous not only because it's a rather good scene, but because of Graham bloody Norton's cartoon face. Picture the scene-24th April 2010-you've been glued to the screen of the Doctor and Amy's latest adventure, an especially gripping one featuring the first returns of both River Song and the Weeping Angels, and are eagerly awaiting the tense climax to the episode. The Doctor has a gun (!), is threatening to shoot and being rather darn scary, and then, a giant yellow bar covers up his mouth to tell us 'Over the Rainbow' is on next, and an animated Graham Norton prances across the screen as if to say 'Haha, I've just ruined your favourite show!'. We can laugh about it now, but this was extremely frustrating at the time, and the BBC received tons of complaints, which only goes to show how perhaps Doctor Who fans are the best of the bunch-they won't let a little man spoil their fun-whilst other fandoms might have expressed their rage online, we went out there and did something about it, and guess what? It never happened again.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 25 Oct 2017 - 11:50

Story 206.2-Flesh and Stone

"So, do you comfort a lot of people on the night before their wedding?"
The Scene: Amy tells the Doctor she's going to marry Rory and, as midnight approaches, takes advantage of the opportunity to make her move on the Doctor.
Why it works: This scene is a perfect example of how never, ever to write Doctor Who. Unlike others, I have no problem with the Doctor kissing companions. 10 and Rose were in love, that makes sense. 10 and Martha was out of necessity, so that makes sense. 10 and Donna was to save his life, so that makes sense too. 11 and Amy...just no. Steven Moffat is insistent he isn't sexist, he writes women well, but I can say with almost absolutely certainty that this is one of his biggest failures-and I did an EPQ report on this, so I have the figures to prove it. This is horrendous writing of a woman, and I'm so glad he left before we got our female Doctor. It's like he wanted to keep up a companion snogging tradition, probably the same reason he made 11 and Clara kiss with no previous attraction. The same goes here-11 and Amy have only had, like 5 previous adventures (I count the excellent Neil Gaiman short story 'Nothing O'Clock' as canon), and in none of those has there been any hint that Amy likes the Doctor. This scene stands out as a monument to all future screenwriters that this is not how you write women, and definitely not how you're meant to write a passionate romantic scene.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 26 Oct 2017 - 8:16

Story 207-The Vampires of Venice

"That reminds me, there's a girl standing outside in a bikini."
The Scene: Rory gets a surprise when his stag do stripper turns out to be none other than the Doctor.
Why it works: I love comedy, and really don't get it when other fans criticise the show for having too much comedy. Alright, maybe in the Moffat era when it's forced and unfunny, but I think drama is always better with just a touch of laughter. If something becomes too dark, it becomes depressing, but add some humour, and it makes the characters more relatable-people do use humour, sometimes in dark situations, because it helps to relieve some of the tension. The Vampires of Venice is a very dark story. Bloodsucking, genocide, flooding-and all at a teatime on Saturday night. But there's little touches like the cake scene, and the fight between Rory and Francesco, that help to alleviate the darkness and make the whole thing a little bit less depressing to watch.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 27 Oct 2017 - 11:49

Story 208-Amy's Choice

"If you had any more tawdry quirks, you could open up a tawdry quirk shop."
The Scene: The sinister Dream Lord is revealed to be behind the illusion worlds the Doctor and companions are currently flitting between.
Why it works: Doctor Who does villains really well, and that's a fact. Whereas other franchises might be tempted to have a villain twirling his moustache and stroking a cat (and alright, Who has been guilty of that in the past), Who has a whole roster of downright creepy baddies with realistic motivations like Davros, Sharez Jek and now, the Dream Lord. The Dream Lord works because we've all had that dream we think is real, and the idea you don't know which is which is a relatable and scary idea. But what's more exciting, the Dream Lord adds to the myth of the show-we know from Colin Baker's era that the Doctor can have a bad side, but this is explored even deeper in this story, where we get to fully see the Doctor's wickedness manifested. Despite being on screen for over fifty years, we still don't know everything about the Doctor, and we never should, but there's just a tinge of joy when we do find out something new. And I can't mention this wicked character without talking about Toby Jones, a fantastic actor who's been in tons of huge films, and it's quite an honour really that he'd take time out of his schedule to do one episode of a TV show. It's a testament to Doctor Who's recent popularity that we can get big name stars in the show and, better still, they're not doing it for the money-they want to do it.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 28 Oct 2017 - 7:18

Story 209.1-The Hungry Earth

"Dyslexia never stopped Da Vinci or Einstein, it's not stopping you."
The Scene: Despite being dyslexic, Elliot draws a perfect map for the Doctor in his plan to prepare for the uprising Silurians.
Why it works: One thing I've always admired about Doctor Who is how it isn't afraid to tackle subjects other shows, never mind just other science fiction, would be terrified to touch. Where other shows might hesitate before including a gay character, Who has an abundance of them. No other show would have a deaf lady in charge of an underwater base without it being important to the plot somehow. And here, we see dyslexia casually referenced, without so much as a raised eyebrow from anybody. This is what makes Who, and the Doctor in particular, so amazing. Nobody cares, and this is exactly the way real life should be, and, unfortunately, isn't. Where other shows might be tempted to make a point of it, or maybe make it absolutely crucial to the plot, Doctor Who simply includes it as part of a character, and better yet, makes it seem absolutely normal. If Chris Chibnall can write about traditionally tricky topics like this without giving them over-importance, then perhaps a female Doctor won't be so bad.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 28 Oct 2017 - 7:26

Story 209.2-Cold Blood

"Don't tell me it's going to be okay, you have to make it okay!"
The Scene: Rory is consumed by the crack in the wall after being shot by Restac, and the Doctor bundles Amy into the TARDIS as she begins to forget him before she can intervene.
Why it works: One of the criticisms of the Moffat era is that there are too many happy endings-love solving everything has been used more times than I care to count. But this episode is a great example of when everything goes wrong, which makes for an intriguing change to the show's formula. The Doctor has a plan, and he's sure it will work, and when it fails, the tension is raised and the episode becomes so much more exciting. Better yet, it looks like everything will be okay, for example when Amy and co. are discussing Earth's future, but the audience know already that the bargaining chip, Alaya, is already dead, killed by Ambrose, and we know that the Doctor's plan's going to go balls up. And then, at the end when it looks like things will get happier, it goes to perhaps its most depressing, irredeemable point when Rory is killed and worse still, his fiancé forgets him. This is a truly devastating idea, and it's completely sold by the fantastic performance of Karen Gillan in, personally, her finest performance to this point, and it speaks volumes that this is topped by her role in the very next episode.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 29 Oct 2017 - 19:49

Story 210-Vincent and the Doctor

"To my mind, that strange, wild man who roamed the fields of Provence was not only the world's greatest artist, but also one of the greatest men who ever lived."
The Scene: In a little over 100 words, Doctor Black explains why Vincent Van Gogh was so extraordinary, whilst the man himself listens in the background.
Why it works: This scene isn't just important in the episode itself, but one of the most important in the entire history of the show. At the risk of repeating myself, this scene is the culmination of just how far this amazing show has come, and is one of the most adult examples of Doctor Who up to this point. It is phenomenal that a little, pulpy sci-fi show for kids, with a 13 week life span, produced such an emotional scene a full 47 years later, with literally every micro-element firing on all cylinders to show exactly what this underrated gem is made of. There's the talent (Richard Curtis and Bill Nighy don't spare their time for anybody), the acting (Tony Curtis is great and I'm surprised he isn't better known), the direction (the turntable is a stroke of genius), the subject matter (no other show has looked at mental illness so sensitively and deeply as this) and the sheer creativity of it (the idea of non diegetic music works when it really shouldn't and I applaud this risk)-essentially, Vincent and the Doctor is one of the often unsung masterpieces of Doctor Who, and is a ground-breaking work of television in its own right.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 30 Oct 2017 - 8:21

Story 211-The Lodger

"Everybody's got dreams, Sophie. Very few are going to achieve them, so why pretend?
The Scene: The Doctor, Craig and Sophie are having a quiet pizza-booze-telly night in, and the Doctor inspires Sophie to take up her monkey inspired dreams.
Why it works: Doctor Who's great when it's in space and on planets and with monsters and all that, but sometimes, it's nice to have a break, which is why I love the Craig stories. They may not be the best examples of the show, but they're great ways to have a laugh for 45 minutes without losing any of the frights and drama usually found in the show. What's perhaps best in them is the complete normality of it-Craig and Sophie are about as ordinary as can be, and it's hilarious to see them caught up in the Doctor's world, one of the craziest in fiction altogether. And despite them being comedies, they don't lose any of the sophisticated plotting the show regularly employs-the character development between the couple is brilliant between the two stories, there's a well realised character arc with a satisfying pay off as we see Craig and Sophie recognise their feelings and none of the show's subtly is lost, as shown in this scene with the Doctor's inspiring message not only to Sophie, but young viewers everywhere. In essence, the total realism of this story makes it possibly the best episode to show somebody who's never watched before.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 31 Oct 2017 - 10:45

Story 212.1-The Pandorica Opens

"Please, listen to me!"
The Scene: The Doctor is sealed inside a perfect prison for him by an impossible alliance of all his greatest enemies.
Why it works: Steven Moffat is often criticised for being too smart-arse clever, or his over-reliance on a series arc, or whatever. But this is one of his finest scripts, and because it actually is clever. Alright, it does depend on the arc (we really didn't need to wait three years to find out the Silence tried to blow up the TARDIS), but the script is so rich and layered it makes it genuinely engaging. There are all sorts of little insignificant seeming clues, like the fan pleasing opening titles with the painting theft, Amy's casual reference to her favourite book, the ring, the photograph, etc. Essentially, the episode is made up of fine little details which coalesce into a mind blowing masterpiece, leading to a fantastic cliffhanger. The Doctor's trapped, Amy's dead, Rory's an Auton and River's probably going to get blown up. It's just a shame the next episode doesn't supply as satisfying a pay-off.

Honourable Mention-
"No, but if you buried the most dangerous thing in the universe, you'd want to remember where you put it."
The Doctor studies the painting in a scene cross-cut with his horse ridden journey to find the Pandorica, which shows the advanced level of cinematography the show reaches in the Smith era, as does the later Cyberman attack scene shown through Amy's blurred vision.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 31 Oct 2017 - 10:57

Story 212.2-The Big Bang

"We're all stories in the end. Just make it a good one, eh? Because it was, you know. It was the best."
The Scene: The Doctor puts young Amelia to bed before deciding to step through the wrong side of the crack.
Why it works: This is undeniably one of Doctor Who's most iconic quotes-as testified by the number of tattoos I've seen of it-because it not only works as a beautiful moment in the episode, but a beautiful reflection on life. Steven Moffat does have problems writing at times-you only have to see my entry for Flesh and Stone in this blog to see what I think about his female writing-but he does understand people-well, he wouldn't be a writer otherwise. Like I've said before, Doctor Who can be an inspiration to so many people, and that's why when it sends a message, it works-that message has been carefully crafted to have just the right impact on the viewer, which is why this works. It's telling you to seize the day, do what you want, etc. because one day, we'll all be dead, and the only way people will remember us is if we do something worthwhile with our lives-write a book, direct a film, whatever, just make sure that you don't waste your chance. Even if you're not into the show, that's one hell of a good tattoo.

Honourable Mentions-
"Something old. Something new. Something borrowed. Something blue."
Amy remembers the Doctor in spectacular fashion in another one of those scene which perfectly epitomises what the Doctor means to so many people.

"One more time..."
River Song terrifies the living s*** out of a Dalek in a great little scene which showed at the time what a mystery River was.

"You need to get me out of the Pandorica."
The Doctor surprises Rory in one of the many scenes featuring the little touches which, like in the last episode, combine to create a satisfying pay-off if you can get your head around the timey-wimey.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 1 Nov 2017 - 10:34

Story 213-A Christmas Carol

"Tonight, I'm a Ghost of Christmas Past."
The Scene: The Doctor begins Kazran on an incredible journey of redemption, starting by showing him some dodgy home video of one of his old school projects.
Why it works: Doctor Who does themes well, and that's a fact. One of its golden ages literally just consisted of homages to horror films, even. One of the reason I love this episode is because it's so Christmassy, it makes all the other oft repeated Christmas films and songs look and sound like they're not even trying. It's come under fire for this-being overly festive, being unoriginal, whatever, but what's wrong with that? Doctor Who has 12 episodes a year (or at least it did-thanks, Mr Chibnall) which are all about space battles and history and stuff, so what's wrong with just the one where the Doctor can don a Santa hat and be jolly? Dickens' novella is one of the true classics of literature, a rare find where it can be taught in English classrooms, analysed and not seem boring and pretentious because it's actually a good story, so it makes sense that Doctor Who, the greatest series of stories, would want to do a homage to it somewhere down the line. The fact it knows it's a parody makes it more enjoyable, and the traditional plot mixed with Who's famous blend of sci-fi and real character makes it a warm, cosy, fuzzy hour perfect to watch by the fire next month.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 2 Nov 2017 - 19:29

Story 214.1-The Impossible Astronaut

"This is cold. Even by your standards, this is cold."
The Scene: Recovering from the sight of the Doctor's death, Amy, Rory and River head to a diner where they see...the Doctor!
Why it works: As I've said before, Doctor Who does surprises well, and it does them even better when nobody knows about them. Alright, maybe we did know about this one a bit (thank you DWM with your four alternate covers), but it's undeniable that this episode packs a number of punches, and never stops hitting with them. The season opener is always a tough episode-you have to keep the viewers you have whilst realising it's your biggest opportunity to get new ones, so the essential thing is to catch them all and never let them go. This probably would have been made all the more difficult by the fact that Who was at its sixth series at this point, where a ton of other shows would lose coherence, viewers and sense, but Who did its best to shake away these fears by killing its protagonist, bringing him back and ending on a child murder. TV was in a golden age, and Doctor Who knew how to be in it.

Honourable Mentions-
"You're lying."
The Doctor confronts Amy in a tense scene which breaks the normal Doctor/companion dynamic brilliantly.

"Is that a Star Trek thing?"
The first appearance of the Silence, a truly original race with a legendary impact on the show.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 2 Nov 2017 - 19:39

Story 214.2-Day of the Moon

"Little girl, are you okay?"
The Scene: A terrified tramp sees the first regeneration of the girl we'll come to know as River Song.
Why it works: Doctor Who's always had arcs-tight themes like the crack, the Key to Time, and looser ones too (see Torchwood, Bad Wolf, Saxon, et al), but Series 6 was when it became more than an arc and became an ongoing drama with a few standalone episodes. Not many people liked this-they said it made it too hard to follow, unappealing to casual viewers, etc. But was it one of Who's most ingenious moves? 2011 was the start of TV's current golden age, with popular shows like The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones starting to emerge, and Who had to compete, so why not copy their show model? People say the classics never had this problem-they were self contained. No they weren't-they unfolded over the course of a month. A month to tell one story. If you missed Part Two of Frontios, you were screwed. If you missed The Almost People in Series 6, less so. This story is definitely the start of a long arc, but what's great about the way it ties in is it drops all these little hints which, like Bad Wolf, seem like they might be part of a loose theme, but the story is self contained, so the viewer can watch this one and possibly watch it again. But then, they drop this bombshell at the end, and they want to know who this girl is, why she's on fire, how that hobo got how he is (alright, maybe not) and bang! They're hooked.

Honourable Mentions-
"Do you understand me? Always."
Rory stands up to the Doctor in perhaps the first step in his character arc where he grows some balls and becomes one of the Whoniverse's best badasses.

"You should kill us all on sight."
The Silence practically commit suicide in an ingenious and unique way to get shut of the monster of the week.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 3 Nov 2017 - 8:37

Story 215-The Curse of the Black Spot

"It's not one star, it's two."
The Scene: The Doctor and pirate captain Henry Avery take a moment out to stare at the stars.
Why it works: The point of this blog is to highlight the outstanding moments in perhaps forgotten stories (whilst also celebrating the same for the classics), and this point is maybe demonstrated best here. It's safe to say this isn't many people's favourites (although I like it), but, like other scenes already highlighted in the blog, this scene demonstrates a rare, delicate moment of reflection in an otherwise non stop story filled with swashbuckling action and fighting. In under a minute, we get some real, genuine character development for Avery, a character who, up until now, has just been known as a desperate boss who wants rid of the Doctor and co., but now we know he's a family man, he has a purpose-but there's a lovely piece of foreshadowing here about the unexpectedness of life too, which shows how sophisticated Doctor Who is-and as I've said before, this does one of the things Who does best, subtly preaching values to live by-to be in the moment; a point also hinted at with the Doctor's earlier line-everybody needs a companion, a friend, somebody to share it with. A lovely moment in an otherwise fast paced story.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 4 Nov 2017 - 20:05

Story 216-The Doctor's Wife

"I just wanted to say hello. Hello, Doctor. It's so very, very nice to meet you."
The Scene: Having given her essence to defeat House, Idris burns up, but makes time to give a farewell to the Doctor.
Why it works: This is perhaps the most quintessential Doctor Who episode ever. Not only does it include all the essential ingredients which make the best stories-the horror of old Rory, the terror of Nephew, the sheer oddity of Auntie and Uncle, not to mention the ingenious plot-but because, more than any other episode (and that's probably a fact), it highlights the important relationship between the two only indispensable elements of the show-the Doctor and the TARDIS. Sure, you can throw in fifty odd companions, Daleks, Cybermen, whatever, but it's completely impossible (but that's a naughty word Razz) to write for the show without them. Like it or not, Doctor Who is a romantic drama, a heart-warming tale about one old man and his ship, but until now, we've thought of her more or less as a vehicle. Now, for the first time, we get a really deep look into the soul of them both, and go on an exhilarating 45 minute journey of love, loss, fear, death, adventure with them whilst still having time for some throwaway gags which just help make the whole thing less gloomy. This is how you write Doctor Who.

Honourable Mentions-
"It's me. I'm the TARDIS."
The Doctor might be a woman now, but her ship got there first-a truly iconic moment.

"No, but I always took you where you needed to go."
Boom! 48 years of plot inconsistencies solved in one ground breaking line.

"How could you do that to me?"
The most Gaiman-y scene in the episode as the ancient Rory tortures Amy.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 5 Nov 2017 - 17:28

Story 217.1-The Rebel Flesh

"Trust Me. I'm the Doctor."
The Scene: The Doctor, Amy and co. are shocked to find another Ganger hiding in the darkness...none other than the Doctor...
Why it works: He's only been in the role for a year, and this is Matt Smith's last two parter. Shocking, isn't it? Don't get me wrong, I love the self contained nature of Series 7 too, but sometimes, I do like a longer story, and this is one fab longer story to end it on, until a whopping three years later when Peter Capaldi brought the two parter back with Dark Water/Death in Heaven. Once you've got over the shock of the cliffhanger itself, you also realise the content's pretty good as well. The Doctor double idea is great, and although it's been done before, it's exciting to see it again. This is the person we trust more than anyone, our one constant in the series, and when his image is taken, we really begin to doubt anything is safe in this universe. The fact that what he wants is for us to trust him, one of the most impossible things to do in this situation, only makes it all the more creepy.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 5 Nov 2017 - 17:31

Story 217.2-The Almost People

"Breathe."
The Scene: At the end of the adventure, Amy's stomach begins to feel wrong-and the Doctor reveals she's pregnant.
Why it works: Sorry to go on about the cliffhanger again, but I genuinely couldn't let it go with this one because it's so fantastic. One of the things I admire about this story is its intricacy. There are some fabulous moments of verisimilitude, plants and pay-offs-the Doctor's boots, Jennifer's story arc, this-I know I've said it before, but Doctor Who really has reached a new level of sophistication, and that makes it all the better.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 6 Nov 2017 - 11:29

Story 218-A Good Man Goes To War

"Where the hell were you today?"
The Scene: After the Battle of Demon's Run, River turns up and reveals her true identity.
Why it works: Here's a confession-I didn't mind the Series 6 split that much. It meant we got more Who throughout the year, and we got Torchwood in the months it was off, so that wasn't so bad. But I don't think it would have worked if there weren't a series arc. As I've said before, I didn't mind the arc this year-it could be intrusive at times, but it kept you hooked, and I'm willing to bet that for all the viewers to turned off, some new ones tuned in. This is one hell of a cliff-hanger, but it does that rare feat of wrapping up the episode's own individual plot whilst leaving you tantalised for the next part. What's more impressive is that, given this has been the closest Who has come to space opera in a long while, with all battles and space monks and the like, Moffat hasn't been tempted to have a similarly explosive cliff-hanger. He tones everything right down to create a gentle scene which still has a monumental impact, and the revelation is all the better for it.

Honourable Mentions-

"Would you like me to repeat the question?"
A milestone for Rory's character arc as he becomes a full badass.

"I want children laughing outside your door, because they've found the house of Colonel Run Away."
The Doctor's been angry before, but this is certainly the scariest he's ever been.

"Night will fall and drown the sun, when a good man goes to war."
Amy loses Melody in one of Who's more horrifically relatable scenes.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 7 Nov 2017 - 11:28

Story 219-Let's Kill Hitler

"You said he was funny. You never said he was hot."
The Scene: The Doctor responds to Amy and Rory's cornfield message and are getting reacquainted, until they're rudely interrupted by Mels.
Why it works: Another one of those episodes which isn't my favourite, but has some great bits, and the best parts about this chaotic episode is the comedy. Maybe this shouldn't be a surprise, seeing as Moffat's pre-Who work largely consists of comedies, but where the plot is weak, there's always a laugh to be found. From the almost silent film-esque acting of this opening scene, Rory punching Hitler, River's post-regeneration flirtation (now that's a mouthful)-this story has it all. But it also works on another level, by slotting into not only the wider story arc of the season, but the complete legacy of the show-this is River's first adventure as we know her and, correct me if I'm wrong, but the first screen regeneration of someone who isn't the Doctor or the Master. It takes all the tropes of those stories where the Doctor's dizzy, confused and gives them to River, which she turns on her head in her own, unique way. It might not be a classic, but Let's Kill Hitler was one of the most fun and perhaps appealing season openers* we've had in a while.

*Well, it would be to the casual viewer with the split screen and all.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 8 Nov 2017 - 12:08

Story 220-Night Terrors

"As much IVF as we could afford."
The Scene: The Doctor finally works out what George is, and confronts his Dad Alex about it.
Why it works: It's undeniable that, from the end of the RTD era to the present day, Doctor Who's definitely got more adult-not just in terms of the sophisticated storylines I've mentioned before, or the improved production values, but by content, and I think this scene is where this new direction makes itself clearest, perhaps because it is highlighted by contrast with a story about a child's fears and big scary dolls (which are still fantastic, I don't mean to sound negative). But this is the first time maybe that the show has been very realistically adult. Alongside the usual characterisation of Amy and Rory as a couple, there's this scene, packed with perhaps uncomfortable references to IVF and miscarriages, commentary on modern life-Mrs Rossiter's hesitance to let the Doctor in, her mistrust of the younger generation, Claire's reluctant night shifts, horrible Purcell with his bullying ways and his squalid flat-beyond the playtime thrills, this is maybe the best social commentary the show's had since the 70s.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 9 Nov 2017 - 11:08

Story 221-The Girl Who Waited

"I'm giving you my days."
The Scene: The Doctor closes the TARDIS door on the old Amy, leaving her to be kindly killed by the Handbots.
Why it works: There's nothing really different to say here to what I've already said in other entries-Matt Smith's brilliant, Karen Gillan's brilliant, Arthur Darvill's brilliant, etc., but I think these are the strongest performances yet from our three leads-not just because of their believable acting, but also because the script is so damn good. Firstly, the notion of the Handbots is fantastic-they don't actually realise they're posing a threat, in fact, they're trying to help, which makes them all the more imposing-they're just trying to be nice. Secondly, it explores one of my favourite topics in Who, what happens to companions when they leave. The sight of older Amy here, all bitter and hating, is a curious sight and ties into my next point, perhaps my favourite part of the episode, is the real character development we've got. The two Amys make a marvellous contrast-the hardened old version learns to be compassionate, whilst the carefree younger one learns she has to fight, which complements Rory's zero to hero arc, which is pretty much complete by this point. But, undeniably, the best piece of characterisation is of the real monster of the piece, the Doctor, which is so unusual it's genuinely shocking, and an interesting case of role reversal-the Doctor usually tries to be nice, but ends up inadvertedly doing the wrong thing occasionally, but this is the role of this week's monsters-today, it's time for the Doctor to be intentionally horrible. In an episode all about love, this raw display of negative emotion creates a startling contrast.

Honourable Mention-
"And then you get to know them, and their face just sort of becomes them, like their personality's written all over it."
The most emotional scene in Doctor Who's history. Fact (maybe not, but oh well).
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 10 Nov 2017 - 8:34

Story 222-The God Complex

"But that's my favourite car. How did you know that was my favourite car?"
The Scene: After working out the mystery behind the Minotaur in the hotel, the Doctor decides enough is enough and drops Amy and Rory back on Earth, complete with new house and car.
Why it works: Today's entry kind of combines the last two-this episode is full of unusually adult themes-both in terms of real world dilemmas and in terms of character development for our leads. This wonderfully deep story explores a range of topics, sometimes taboo, barely touched upon in mainstream media, such as the notion of faith, cowardice, Howie's stutter, imprisonment, etc. But what I like most about this episode, as highlighted in this scene, is the superb continued evolution of Amy. Her child to adult storyline, which has been building since her first appearance, builds to a climax here and it's especially poignant that it's the Doctor, the very person who encourages her to find her inner child, who forces her to grow up, and this wonderfully complements the previous story where we find another surprising side to the Doctor. People might not like this year's stories, but it's hard to deny the characterisation is brilliantly deep.

Honourable Mention-
"You started to praise it, didn't you?"
Rita starts to worship the Minotaur in a touching scene which sees the unfortunate end of one of the show's best one off characters.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 11 Nov 2017 - 9:44

Story 223-Closing Time

"I think it's fair to say in the language of your age, that I lived my dream. I owned the stage. Gave it a hundred and ten per cent."
The Scene: The Doctor comforts the cranky Stormageddon with an impressive display of the stars.
Why it works: I'm sure you'll have gathered by now that I like my Doctor Who sophisticated, with all sorts of character development and contrasts and stuff, and today's entry has another scene which exemplifies these qualities. In one of the lowest key series pre-finales of the show, where threat is replaced largely with comedy, this tender scene stands out even more, with the connection between two people of such opposing ages, yet still understanding each other, making it all the more poignant. It also helps to touchingly bring the Doctor's arc of the series to a close-like Amy's child to adult arc which finished in the last episode, the Doctor completes a similar journey here-he's been running around the universe trying to escape his death for most of the season, but now, he realises looking into a baby's eyes that his time is up-he knows he's past tense, and he has nothing left to do apart from face his destiny.

Honourable Mention-
"So they made you a Doctor today, did they? Doctor River Song. How clever you are."
Madame Kovarian kidnaps River in a gentle cliffhanger which, in a change to episode 12s of recent years, delivers mild excitement rather than full blown surprise.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sun 12 Nov 2017 - 21:03

Story 224-The Wedding of River Song

"Well it has never laid a glove on me!"
The Scene: The Doctor's farewell tour is abruptly halted when he learns the Brigadier has died.
Why it works: I've talked a lot about the emotions of Doctor Who in the past few days, but I think this is genuinely one of the most touching scene in the entire series. It's always sad when a person linked so intrinsically with the show as Nicholas Courtney passes away, but what I admire most about this scene is that they didn't just put a credit in front of an episode post-production when somebody dies, Steven Moffat took the time out to craft a story which pays real tribute to UNIT's leader-not only in this scene, but in the nature of the Eye Drive, surely a homage to Courtney's famous convention tales of 'Inferno', the "eye-patch one". But this scene isn't just a mawkish sentiment-it serves a point to the story. Like I've noted in previous entries, this serves a great contrast to the rest of the episode, a sentimental minute in a chaotic story. But it also helps the Doctor realise he has to die. The Brigadier is one of his oldest friends, since his second incarnation, and it's poignant to think that when the Doctor realises he can never see the Brigadier again (not without messing up the timelines), he realises his time has passed and he has to do what's right. The best way for Doctor Who to acknowledge death is to deal with it head on, and this is an often forgotten moment in criticism of Moffat's ability to kill his characters.

Honourable Mentions-

"You look rubbish."
The Doctor and Amy are reunited in a fun moment which reminds viewers of their special relationship.

"The Doctor is very precious to me, you're right. But do you know what else he is, Madame Kovarian? Not here."
A truly chilling scene in which Amy murders one of the show's best love-to-hate villainesses.

"Now, we're in the middle of a combat zone, so we'll have to do the quick version."
The Doctor and River get married in what is now an iconic scene in the show's history.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Mon 13 Nov 2017 - 8:05

Story 225-The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe

"No, please, don't show me that! Please don't show me that!"
The Scene: Madge Arwell sees her husband's plane shot down whilst flying a forest through the time vortex.
Why it works: One of the best things about Doctor Who is that it appeals to literally everybody. There are well over a thousand stories with all the mediums combined, and there will definitely be a story in there for every person. This isn't one of the fans' favourite episodes (although I adore it), but that's because, with no offence intended, it wasn't made for fans. The typical Doctor Who fan likes space battles and planets and stuff-but this is a Christmas episode, perhaps Who's best chance of the year to appeal to everybody, and that's what Moffat did so brilliantly here, taking the familiar setting of C.S. Lewis' works whilst injecting a bit of Who's signature blend of sci-fi and fantasy, making this one of the show's most relatable episodes to a casual viewer. By using a typical figure of a mother, but not bordering on stereotypical, the female viewer is allowed to emotionally connect with Madge-they believe the fears for her children, her determination, her upset highlighted in this scene. Whatever you think of the actual plot of the episode, it's undeniable this was a subtly relaunch of the show-now the Astronaut hi-jinks of the previous season are over, the Doctor has a new life but still has to reconnect with the old one, via Amy and Rory-and I'm willing to bet it's been a successful one.

Honourable Mention-
"The answer is, of course, because they're going to be sad later."
A tender moment which borders on beautiful poetry.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Tue 14 Nov 2017 - 11:28

Story 226-Asylum of the Daleks

"Day three six three. The terror continues."
The Scene: Oswin makes a soufflé. Very badly.
Why it works: I love surprises. The feeling when something just hits you out of the blue is so wonderful, and it's a shame that, with the internet and all nowadays, we don't get surprises as much as we used to, which is why I love this scene. Only the immense organizational skills of Doctor Who, and the trustworthiness of its fans, could have allowed such a fantastic surprise not to be leaked. And what a surprise it was! It's hard to imagine for a new viewer that a scene of a girl badly making a soufflé and listening to classical music sent the nation's hearts a-beating simultaneously, but you have to remember that here was the new companion, making her debut a full three months early, and what an introduction it was. Throughout this fast-paced, rollicking adventure, we get to know Oswin as a clever, relaxed, flirty character so full rounded we invest in her fully in just 50 minutes, which helps to make her shock demise at the end of the episode all the more earth shattering, so much so you don't even question the slight plot flaws wrapped up in it at first. Many people might not like Clara now, but it's hard to deny this was one of the best companion introductions we've ever had.

Honourable Mentions-
"It's not one of those things you can fix like you fix your bow tie."
In a marvellous piece of foreshadowing, Amy fixes the Doctor's bow tie, which apparently isn't as easy as fixing her marriage...watch out for this again later on.

"Are those things eggs?"
Rory hideously misunderstands the Daleks in a truly terrifying scene which makes them scary again.

"Why didn't he just tell us?"
Amy and Rory's marriage is fixed as the Doctor straightens his bow tie...

"The milk, Oswin. The milk and the eggs for the soufflés."
Oswin meets her end in an unexpected shock which sort of brings the episode full circle.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Wed 15 Nov 2017 - 8:24

Story 227-Dinosaurs on a Spaceship

"The missiles. See them shine? See how valuable they are. And they're all yours."
The Scene: The Doctor casually blows up the antagonist.
Why it works: This has been a much criticised scene, mainly because the Doctor is acting so out of character, but I think it's actually an interesting case of just how little we still know about the Doctor-the show is still called Doctor Who, after all. It also harks back to the Sylvester McCoy days, with the Doctor being a mysterious figure-we don't think he'll actually go through with killing a person, but it's a big shock when he does, and further exaggerates the Doctor's character. It's not too much of an out of character scene either-the Doctor does whatever he has to do to do the right thing, and we've seen from the episode that this is one particularly nasty villain-he kills dinosaurs, he hurt Rory's Dad, he rapes Egyptian Queens, so his fate was fully deserved. If these are the kinds of plot twists Chris Chibnall has in store for Series 11, I think we're in for a treat.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by LastOfTheSonics on Wed 15 Nov 2017 - 16:17

I agree with that choice. I actually liked seeing the hidden darker side of the Doctor.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Thu 16 Nov 2017 - 8:55

Story 228-A Town Called Mercy

"This is not how we roll, and you know it."
The Scene: Amy tries to convince the Doctor not to give Kahler-Jek over to the Gunslinger.
Why it works: Nothing really new to add to the blog today, just another opportunity to expand on the wonderful sophistication of Doctor Who. This scene is so brilliantly tense because we believe the Doctor might do it, and that's only because we saw him kill somebody in the last episode-it would have been unthinkable before that. But it's also great because it shows the fantastic attention to detail the show gets nowadays, and the ongoing, deeply embedded continuity really makes it feel like it's all part of one universe. Whereas in the classic series, important events were often forgotten to make way for the next week's plot (looking at you, Adric's death), every piece of character in this era is important-in this episode alone, we have the development of the Doctor as a darker character, flashbacks to Amy's failed motherhood and an exploration into how the 200 years the Doctor spent on his farewell tour has changed him-a gap surely waiting to be filled in by Big Finish in a couple of years, and one I especially can't wait for.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Fri 17 Nov 2017 - 15:58

Story 229-The Power of Three

"But this is one corner of one country in one continent on one planet that's a corner of a galaxy that's a corner of a universe that is forever growing and shrinking and creating and destroying and never remaining the same for a single millisecond."
The Scene: The Doctor realises Amy and Rory are probably going to want to stop adventuring.
Why it works: Regular readers of the blog will know by now that I like my Doctor Who with emotion, which is exactly why I've picked this scene. We can probably all agree the plot of this episode isn't particularly strong, but the moments of characterisation are outstanding. The dynamic between the three regulars, which is already incredibly close, is possibly the tightest it's ever been here-the dialogue flies fast, and paints one of the most lifelike portrayals of companions we've ever seen as Amy and Rory flip from reality to space and back. This is exemplified by including Brian, one of the show's funniest, and most normal, people, as a sort of landmark to indicate why they can't have both lives. This character journey though culminates in this absolutely beautiful scene. Perfect dialogue, a tender soundtrack and adorable performances make this one of the truly iconic moments in a series packed with them. We're probably all worried about Chibnall's era-but there's some consolation ahead if he can keep up this level of dialogue.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek on Sat 18 Nov 2017 - 9:03

Story 230-The Angels Take Manhattan

"Shut up. Together, or not at all."
The Scene: Rory tries to take his life by jumping off Winter Quay, but Amy won't let him-not unless he takes her too.
Why it works: This brilliant episode is packed full of emotional moments, and some of you may be surprised I didn't pick the scene where Amy and Rory actually leave (although that'll be an honourable mention, for sure), but this is my favourite as, unlike the actual farewell scene which felt a bit unnecessarily tacked on, this fantastic moment has an air of finality about it, and regular readers should know by now it features some of my favourite elements of Who-great performances, emotion, touching music and, best of all, a real character journey-it's long been a theme, sometimes a bit of a running joke, of the era that Rory loves Amy more than she loves him, but it's absolutely clear here that they love each other equally, and the fact they're willing to take their lives, without knowing if the plan will work, makes this all the more poignant. In addition, the only reason they thought of the plan was because it's what the Doctor would do-this shares parallels with Clara's death, they've become too self-assured and this creates fabulous foreshadowing for the themes of the 50th Anniversary of the Doctor being a warrior, and turning other people into weapons, as highlighted in Journey's End. I may have laboured my point, but this scene is a fitting finale to two and a half exciting seasons with the Ponds.

Honourable Mentions-
"When one's in love with an ageless god who insists on the face of a twelve year old, one does one's best to hide the damage."
A touchingly written scene which epitomises River's relationship with the Doctor.

"That gravestone, Rory's, there's room for one more name, isn't there?"
Although the previous scene did it better, this is a shocking and well written end to the Ponds.

"And here we are, you and me, on the last page."
The episode comes full circle which provides the pay off to a brilliant piece of foreshadowing which seemed so irrelevant at the start of the episode.
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Re: 200 Golden Moments+

Post by Dalek Yesterday at 21:18

Story 231-The Snowmen

"Truth is singular. Lies are words, words, words."
The Scene: Madame Vastra interviews Clara, and she can only answer in one word.
Why it works: This is an absolutely fantastic episode-it feels so authentically Victorian, but without losing any of the modern edge Doctor Who has, perhaps a quintessential story for the show, and it was hard to pick a single golden moment. But this is undeniably one of the show's finest ever scenes. Being a companion is hard, and Clara had one hell of a job following the fantastic double act of Amy and Rory, and this is one of the best ways Moffat could have showed her potential, using a genuinely unique and original idea to show what she's made of. Not many people ended up liking her, but it's hard not to enjoy Victorian Clara with her pluck, inquisition and curiosity. The fantastic writing here shows Clara under pressure, the main skill for a companion to have, and the role reversal at the end hints at her cheeky nature-she's so fully rounded it makes her second demise at the end of the episode even more of a shock. Most shows aim for a fluffy, light episode on Christmas Day, but Doctor Who did the opposite-it became darker, and all the better for it.

Honourable Mentions-
"Do you want me to get the memory worm?"
A hilarious scene where we get to see Strax really was worth saving.

"Sir-it's Sherlock Holmes!"
Wholock finally happens in another funny scene perfectly showing the Doctor as the maddest and cleverest man in the room.

"Sorry, it's just-didn't know I'd put it on."
The Doctor puts on his bow tie and gets back to being himself in one of the episode's brilliant little touches letting us see more of the Doctor's internal character-see also grabbing the umbrella subconsciously for Clara to reach the ladder later on, and the London Underground biscuit tin.
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Dalek
The Ninth Doctor's Tardis

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